All posts by destinyzx1

A young man who has but one simple desire; to go back in time and relive his youth.

Blaster Master Zero Review

Blaster Master Zero Review – Written by Jose Vega

Purchased product for the sake of the review.

During the era of the NES, a game called Blaster Master was released made by Sunsoft. It was a fun game that got a lot of praise but sadly not a lot of love. It was overlooked but it did have a legacy that lasted almost 20 years, spawning a sequel, spin-offs, and a re-imagining. In November 2016, Inti Creates announced that they plan to try their luck on the franchise with a retro 8-bit remake called Blaster Master Zero. The guys at Inti know how to deliver good titles such as Azure Striker Gunvolt as well as the Mega Man Zero & ZX series but could they pull it off with this? The answer is simple. Yes.

Blaster Master Zero is an 8-bit remake of the original and since it is, the plot is similar. The story is set on Earth, set centuries after humanity was able to restore the planet after it plunged into an ice age due to endless wars. It focuses on a scientist named Jason Frudnik who finds a frog-like creature, calling it Fred. One day, Fred escapes and heads to a strange hole. Jason gives chase only to end up inside and discovers a weaponized tank called Sophia III. Seeing that the underworld is still around, Jason uses Sophia III to explore in the hopes of finding Fred and anything else that comes his way.

It’s straightforward but unlike the NES version, it includes stuff that was in the original Japanese incarnation, Metafight. I like how it ties the two together, despite it being a reboot. But in a way, I find it enjoyable seeing how Inti Creates pays tribute to the franchise as a whole.

Being that it’s a reboot, Blaster Master Zero’s gameplay is similar to the original NES game. Piloting the tank Sophia III, you explore 9 different areas while battling enemies and acquiring upgrades for your tank. Sophia III can shoot in three directions, jump really high and can contend with any situation. I should mention that the game is a Metroidvania-style game, hence the exploration. But you aren’t limited to just Sophia III. Many of the areas contain small caves for Jason to explore. The game then shifts to an overhead view where you explore said caves, shoot down monsters and find items. Your gun has a total of 8 different types and each work well depending on the situation. Heck, some gun types can be more effective than others. Boss fights are there too and strategy is important because just shooting may not be enough.

As far as length goes, the game will take you roughly 5-6 hours if you are going for 100% completion. If you are playing the game on the Nintendo Switch, the game also has co-op multiplayer where you and a friend can team up and kick butt. A nice welcoming feature indeed but sadly it isn’t on the 3DS version. Not much of a bad thing but regardless, the game is still enjoyable. Unlike the NES version, this one actually have save points and checkpoints. The checkpoint system is superb and in case you go down, you can continue where you left off either at a save point or in a cave entrance. Amazing. A sigh of relief for people that felt the original was too hard. Presentation-wise, the game is amazing. Inti Creates did a great job reimagining the original Blaster Master and making it better. It’s vibrant and lively, not to mention colorful. The music is amazing with some really addicting tunes and they also help add more to each area. Controls are spot on and precise. Perfect would be too appropriate of a word to say how good they are. With a recent update, the game also supports the Switch Pro Controller so to anyone that has this you have another option to play the game. Blaster Master Zero has a fair amount of challenge. It isn’t too hard or too easy but if you know your way around, the game isn’t difficult.

If I were to find any negatives, it’s that some levels have way too many hazards, forcing you to either find a way around or go for what’s obvious. It can get difficult especially with enemies firing at you and one mistake can lead you to an unexpected death. It would be nice if the game wouldn’t have sections that require you to improvise but since it’s a reboot, I only wish it can be alleviated. But honestly the game is that good, I see it as a minor negative at best.

Blaster Master Zero is a game that brings new life to a franchise that has a lasting legacy. Sharp controls, great music, amazing presentation and the addition of co-op on the Switch version adds a lot to an otherwise impressive game. What’s even better is that the game is worth $10. For $10, you are getting a game that offers so much and more. If you haven’t played the original NES game or any of the others, this is a perfect start for you. Bottom line, Blaster Master Zero is worth your money. I guarantee it.

I give Blaster Master Zero a PERFECT 10 out of 10. It also earns my personal Seal of Approval. Get this game now whether on the Switch or 3DS.

Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment Review

Product provided for this review by Yacht Club Games.

Three years ago, a little game called Shovel Knight was released. It was praised both critically and commercially for not only being fun but as a tribute to the games of yesteryear. A year later, Yacht Club Games releases its first expansion, Plague of Shadows, serving as a what-if story with Plague Knight as the protagonist. It was a great expansion that offered something different. Now Yacht Club Games is back at it again with the second expansion called Specter of Torment. The focus shifts on the scythe wielding Specter Knight but can this second expansion deliver just as well as the last one?

Unlike the previous two campaigns, Specter of Torment is a prequel to the original Shovel Knight. It centers on Specter Knight as he’s ordered by The Evil Enchantress to gather knights from all over the region to form her Order of No Quarter. In addition, the campaign details on Specter Knight’s origins. It is an interesting premise and adds more to the lore of the Shovel Knight world.

Shovel Knight has always been best known for its gameplay and presentation. The gameplay still is excellent in the case of Specter of Torment. Since Specter Knight is the focus, he plays differently than the previous two. He packs a scythe that can be used offensively against foes and is also used as a means to move about. He can do a dash strike either diagonally up or down and it doubles as a dash. He can walk up on walls for a few seconds, allowing wall climbing. He is fueled by darkness and in turn, has access to several “curios” or relics that offer unique advantages. To get those, he has to collect red skulls in each level and exchange them. The abilities can also be upgraded too. Like Shovel and Plague Knight, he can get garb that can change how he plays. It adds more variety to a character that can provide so much.

There is no world map for instead you have the castle that serves as a hub for all your needs. Similar to the Mega Man series, you have the option to choose your stage. It’s good in case one level is tough, you can try another that’s easier. As far as length goes, it’ll take you 4-6 hours to beat and New Game + adds more hours into it along with the challenges providing a lot for your money’s worth. I’m serious. For $10 (or $25 if you get the Treasure Trove Pack), it offers a lot.

The presentation is simply a sight to behold. Though it’s old school, the detail is amazing. It amazes on how a game like this provide so much and fact is, Yacht Club Games captures the feel of old school games for the modern era. Specter of Torment should get praise for its music. Jake Kaufman is back at it again delivering music that makes your ears fill with excitement. They are remixed, yes but they also feel original. Good much alongside great gameplay and a strong presentation really makes this a surefire hit. I love it personally. Now I only wish that we would get the soundtrack for this.

As for anything negative, I couldn’t find any that hinders the game. Absolutely none. The game can be hard but it’s a good kind of hard, something that is sadly missed nowadays. I’m happy that it can be challenging and it doesn’t punish the player as much. From my experience, I say that it is a game that’s worth playing plus it does detail what would soon follow in the events of Shovel Knight’s campaign. People that couldn’t get it on the Switch will have to wait a month before this comes out for all the other consoles. If you purchased the Treasure Trove Edition, the game also comes with the option to body swap in Shovel Knight’s campaign. You can mix the genders of all the characters involved for some crazy possibilities.

Specter of Torment offers a lot at a reasonable price giving us a new playable character, hours of replay value and other additional features. Yacht Club Games hits it out of the park yet again with another expansion to an otherwise amazing game. With King Knight’s expansion on the horizon, I can say that Spectre of Torment is one that is worthy to be knighted… with a shovel of all things. You know what they say, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

I give Shovel Knight: Specter of Torment a perfect 10 out of 10. This game is worth your money, that’s a fact.

Pokemon Sun & Pokemon Moon Review

Pokémon Sun & Moon Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided for this review by Nintendo.

There’s an old adage we always say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Pokémon has always been like that for over twenty years, providing the same concept through multiple generations. Now we reach Generation 7 with the arrival of Pokémon Sun & Pokémon Moon. It has been said that the game is going to be different than the previous generations. Will the game carry the same enjoyable experience or will the changes make this be something else?

The story is set in the region of Alola, based off of Hawaii. It focuses on a young individual who just moved from Kanto with his mom to Alola. With help from his uncle Prof. Kukui, the trainer embarks on a journey to become the strongest trainer in the region. There’s also another plot revolving Lillie and a Pokémon of hers named Nebby who’s on the run from a shady organization. Most of the story’s told through scenes that occur during your journey. It’s done well though I feel the story regarding Lillie can be improved a bit, not that it’s a bad thing.

All Pokémon games have had the same gameplay since the beginning. But this time, Nintendo & the Pokémon Company decide to take a gamble and provide a different experience for players. The gameplay is the same where you travel all over a region to catch Pokémon and use them to battle, other trainers. If you’ve played previous Pokémon handheld games, it’s straightforward. In the case of Sun & Moon, how you go about your journey is different. Gone are the usual gym leaders and in its place comes the Island Challenge.

In the Island Challenge, you travel from one island to the next completing various Island Trials. The Island Trials are missions where you tackle specific objectives before you take on the Island Totem Pokémon in an SOS battle. The Totem Pokémon will sometimes bring ally Pokémon to fight alongside it. After beating the Totem Pokémon, you complete the trial. Some islands will have more than one Trial and they need to be completed in order to reach the Grand Trial. Grand Trials are like gym battles where you take on the Island Kahuna. Beating them will complete the trial and you will move on to the next island.

I personally love the Island Challenges. Instead of battling, you have to do objectives to move on from one trial to the next. It helps the game feel fresh and different while keeping everything the same and I hope that future Pokémon games can follow this style. Not only that they have removed gyms but also HMs. Replacing HMs is the Ride Pager, giving you access to Ride Pokémon that can help trek through Alola. A welcome addition to the game and one that is quite fun to have.

Another addition is Z-Moves. As you journey through Alola, you’ll acquire Z-Crystals that give your Pokémon access to super powered moves that can turn the tide of battle. However they can only be used once per battle, so be careful. A neat addition and can be helpful in a moment’s notice. You can also take pictures of Pokémon with your Pokedex and send them to get results. You get rewarded for it to boot.

The game is a long one and depending if players want to complete their Pokedex and have all the Pokémon, it can take a while. But for an estimate, the game will take roughly 30-40 hours, even longer especially when you can also trade and battle online adding the length to unbelievable levels. Speaking of which, the online has changed. You still have the usual GTS but the addition of the Festival Plaza allows players to meet other people and earn coins so they can use them to improve their plaza to make it better.

Presentation-wise, the game is a big step up from Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. The characters look a lot better and the environment itself is vibrant and colorful. Battles are intense and though it reuses stuff from the previous game, I won’t complain. The Z-Moves themselves do look great. But if I were to find any nitpicks with the game, I feel the story needs a bit of work. Also the game can have a tendency to slow down when double battles occur. It mostly happens on a regular Nintendo 3DS but if you’re playing on a New Nintendo 3DS, the slowdown doesn’t happen. Considering that the game is pushing the 3DS hardware to its limits, it’s to be expected.

Pokémon Sun & Moon has breathed new life into the franchise, providing a familiar feel while also adding new features and innovations. Sure the story can be hit or miss but overall, it’s a satisfying experience. So much to do in the region of Alola that you can spend weeks or even months and with updates that allow players to transfer Pokémon from previous games to this one adds it even more. The franchise’s 20th Anniversary was a huge celebration and this game’s release certifies that this game franchise will be around for a long time to come.

I give Pokémon Sun & Pokémon Moon a perfect 10 out of 10. Legendary status and it’s worth your time and money.

Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World Review

Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided for this review by Nintendo.

In 2015, a little game called Yoshi’s Woolly World came out on the Wii U. It was a nice game that was fun for both kids and adults, following in the same way as Kirby’s Epic Yarn. Two years later, Nintendo decides to port this title over to the Nintendo 3DS and call it Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World. Despite being similar, the question is if the game has something that can stand out from its Wii U counterpart. The answer is yes.

Let’s start with the story and it’s straightforward. Life on Craft Island is peaceful until Kamek comes in and decides to turn all the Yarn Yoshis into wonder wool. Only a green and red Yarn Yoshi survived, despite their best efforts in trying to stop Kamek. So now the two remaining Yoshis must travel to stop Kamek and save their friends. It’s a pretty simple story and a good introduction for players to get into the game.

If you’ve played any of the Yoshi games, you will feel right at home here. You play as a Yoshi, traveling through six worlds each consisting of 8-9 stages. Yoshi can run, jump, ground/hammer pound and toss yarn balls at enemies. He can also absorb enemies and spit them out to form yarn balls. Collectibles are abounding in each stage such as Wonder Wool, pencil coins, hearts and Smiley Flowers. Wonder Wool is for acquiring new Yoshis and flowers help unlock an additional “S” stage at the end. Getting 100% completion requires you to find everything and the game do allow you to explore, which is good. The game also has badges where depending on a number of beads can add a bit of advantage for Yoshi. They range from having all big yarn balls to helping you find hidden stuff. It’s really cool. The controls are spot on and you have the option to customize them to your liking. If you plan on going for 100%, it can take you roughly 10-15 hours.

The worlds all follow a traditional pattern like grasslands, desert, skies, etc. but it’s all done pretty well and you can tell too. With the idea of yarn gives the game the opportunity to express itself. Design wise, it is exactly as the Wii U version. Nintendo should be commended for pulling off a port like this. I was surprised because the 3DS handheld can be quite limited but Nintendo has always provided games that push the potential of their systems to their limits. This is no exception. Also, the game runs a solid 30fps on regular 3DS/2DS and 60fps on New 3DS handhelds. Both handhelds run the game fine so no matter what you play, it is good all the same.

But despite this, there are several things that this game has over the Wii U counterpart. For starters, there is no co-op at all. A minor nitpick but the game is just as fun. Also, Amiibo functionality is aplenty here but expanded further giving Yoshi access to even more designs. The Poochy amiibo released for the game can also be used here to help bring Poochy to the game so you can use it to help find hidden goodies. Speaking of Poochy, this game also includes a Gold Rush mode, exclusive to the 3DS version, where you can ride Poochy along and collect beads. Using the Poochy amiibo turns it into a time attack mode as well. This game also has the option to switch between Classic and Mellow Mode. Think of Mellow Mode as an easy mode with Yoshi gaining wings and his yarn balls are replaced with Poochy-Pups. They are exclusive to the 3DS version as they can help you find hidden items and plus they don’t go away. After throwing one, they come back. If you feel the game can be difficult at times, Mellow Mode is the mode and the game doesn’t punish you for using it. Plus you can change modes at anytime.

I couldn’t find anything wrong with the game. The game’s pretty solid, the music is relaxing and nice to listen to and it offers plenty for your money’s worth. So yeah, the game is good. Very good with a high amount of replay value to boot.

Overall Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World took the Wii U version and added a few things that help make it stand out. It is the same but with more Amiibo functionality, the option to change modes on the fly and some additional modes make the game feel different and satisfying. If you were unable to try this when it came out for the Wii U, then this is a definite guarantee. I recommend this game. Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World is worth your money.

I give Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World a 9 out of 10. This game earns my personal Seal of Approval. Worth every penny.

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

Where do I even start with Metroid? Released in 1986, it was a groundbreaking game that introduced many features that would be mainstays for the franchise. It also gave us the first female protagonist in gaming history, Samus Aran. Metroid spawned eleven games. Many of them like Metroid Prime became glorified hits. Though it has had some rough edges, it’s a franchise where it’s games are always a delight to enjoy. The year 2016 would see Metroid resurface once more but it ha been mired in controversy. I speak of Metroid Prime: Federation Force a game that was subject to hate from everyone, considering that it was Metroid’s 30th anniversary. But does it really deserve the hate it got or is this game worth giving a chance?

The game takes place after Metroid Prime 3: Corruption with the threat of Phazon having been eradicated from the galaxy. Trouble is brewing within the Bermuda system and the Space Pirates, reeling from their previous defeat are planning something big. To counter the inevitable threat, the Galactic Federation forms a task force to stop them. It’s a straightforward story that does have some interesting twists but overall, it’s all right at best. What is surprising is that the focus is shifted away from Samus Aran. Instead it centers on the Galactic Federation. Sure Samus does make appearances in the game but it’s a surprising change compared to what we normally see.

Federation Force plays similarly to the Metroid Prime games where you explore, shoot things, etc. On a handheld, I say they emulated it rather well. The game is a mission-based adventure where you travel to one of three planets and complete objectives that the G.F gives you. You operate a giant Federation mech that you use to explore planets, shoot space pirates and complete missions. Controls are very solid, just like in the Prime games. They can take a while to get used to because it’s a Metroid game on a handheld but it’s well done.

Gyro controls help make your aim precise and that’s a good thing. I didn’t have any issues with them. Most games didn’t incorporate these controls well enough but for a game like this, it’s done pretty well. You can use analog controls if you feel they can be tiresome.

Speaking of the mech, you have the option to customize it however you like with different chips. They provide unique effects, giving opportunities for experimentation. Be warned that they can break, aside from one that can’t be broken. Also you can decide what weapons you can use like missiles, beams, etc. Depending on the mission you’ll have to decide carefully. Oh and you can also have your mech get a paint job. It’s cosmetic but it’s pretty cool.

In the presentation style, the game is acceptable. Having three different settings give the game a bit of variety. Sure it’s traditional cause you have an ice planet, a desert planet and a factory planet but they shouldn’t stop you from taking in the scenery. Due to the game’s mission structure, your exploration is limited but it won’t stop you from finding stuff like secrets. There are plenty and can unlock new stuff for your mech such as chips and paint jobs.

Federation Force’s campaign mode can take you roughly 8-10 hours, depending if you play it by yourself or with friends. Yes, the campaign has both offline and online co-op. Now that’s a good thing since with friends, it helps alleviate the game’s shortcomings and plus, it’s more fun if you have friends by your side blasting space pirates. The game’s built with co-op in mind and it’s done real well. Solo however can be a pain and depending on mission structure, it can get problematic. There is a high amount of replay value as you can go back to previous missions to get high scores and medals if you’re skilled enough. It’s even higher with friends.

In addition the campaign, there’s also Blast Ball. Think of it as soccer but with mechs, 3-on-3. Your job is to score three points while preventing your opponents from scoring. It’s an okay mode at best and doesn’t offer anything else. Once you play it for a bit, you get an idea and it can be kind of boring. Not much to say on that. Federation Force has Amiibo support but it only works on both Samus and Zero Suit Samus. They provide new paint jobs with added advantages. It’s okay at best.

In spite of some good things this has, there’s a bit of bad. The music isn’t as interesting as previous Metroid titles. They don’t have the kind of hook that gets you to listen to them. I would sum the music up as forgetful. Also since the game puts focus on the Galactic Federation, Samus gets downplayed. For the sake of spoilers, I feel that Samus should have been utilized more in the game. Heck having her be an unlockable after beating it would have been nice. But I feel that this leaves a lot to be desired. It also doesn’t help that this game was released to coincide with Metroid’s 30th anniversary. Having this to celebrate a franchise like Metroid just turns off a lot of people. Sadly it did and not a lot of people got to play it.

I’ll be fair. Metroid Prime: Federation Force is a welcome addition to the franchise. The gameplay is solid and the presentation is well done. But its many flaws hinder the game from reaching its full potential. Fans of the franchise do deserve a better Metroid game and sadly this isn’t it. But with the game not doing well sales-wise, the future is uncertain. I only wish Nintendo can provide us a proper Metroid game… instead of this.

This took me half a year to do and I had to think about this well. However I will give the benefit of the doubt to this game. Metroid Prime: Federation Force gets a 6 out of 10 from me.

Street Fighter V Review

Street Fighter V Review – Written by Jose Vega

Purchased my copy at full price for the sake of this review.

For almost 30 years, Street Fighter was the series that gave new life to the fighting game genre. Whether it’s the memorable characters, music or its tight gameplay, it brought us so much that fans still enjoy to this day. It’s previous entry Street Fighter IV provided so much, despite the game getting numerous updates and revisions. Last year, Capcom was ready to bring Street Fighter into the next gaming generation with Street Fighter V, released as a Sony exclusive for PS4 and PC. The question looms… does it deliver the same way SFIV had all those years ago or will this game crash and burn to the ground? Considering that it’s almost a year since the game’s release, I am going to be reviewing the game in its current state.

The Street Fighter series has never been known for it’ story. This game’s no exception. The story is split between “Character Story” and the Cinematic Story that was released in June as a free update. But to summarize, M. Bison of Shadaloo enacts his plan for world domination and he does so with the Black Moons. Now several groups are gathering to put a stop to Bison’s plans but many may be having plans of their own. The story is pretty predictable, your traditional “stop the bad guy before they take over the world” thing. Nothing fancy. Considering that this is set in-between Street Fighter IV and III, it does explain certain events that we would see in later games. The character story mode however consist of short segments that last 6-10 minutes but provide a bit of exposition for all the characters involved. They’re harmless fun but at least you get an idea of what the characters are and their motivations.

Street Fighter V doesn’t offer much in terms of content. Later updates did include modes like Challenges but when it was first released, the game provided little. It makes the game feel barebones. I find it disappointing. Many other fighting games like Mortal Kombat, Tekken and Smash Bros. offer a lot of content and variety at full price and the most important thing is having content for people that just want to pick up and play. To see that it doesn’t have that is upsetting and will only drive consumers away. I am aware that the game was released for the competitive crowd but unless there’s something for casuals, it’ll be a failure from the get go. There is online play but when it was first released, it had numerous server issues that hindered the experience. They did fix it eventually but overall, Street Fighter V is barebones on release and to this day, it still is. Capcom dropped the ball and they should have put a bit more time in refining the game to make it complete.

Despite the negatives, Street Fighter V is great in terms of graphics and gameplay. The game looks amazing, a step up from Street Fighter IV. From a design standpoint, it’s well done. The character models are better but for some reason, they seem a bit too muscular. All the stages are vibrant and colorful, backing it up with music. SFV’s high point also includes the music. The music is very good and some tracks are real addicting to listen to. Thankfully you have the option to switch between stage and character music so that’s a plus.

If you’ve played a previous Street Fighter game then you’ll feel right at home. The controls are the same but there are a few noticeable changes. For starters, everyone has a Critical Art, a V-Trigger and V-Reversal. They are the game’s main gimmicks. Each character has a specific V-Trigger and Reversal ability that sets them apart from the others. They depend on the character and can make matches pretty intense. I can say that Capcom did do a good job at making the controls easier for newcomers but can also be challenging for competitive players. Compared to Street Fighter IV’s battle system, this is a bit easier. Though I wish that the game could allow players to choose from a variety of V-Trigger/Reversal and Critical Arts. It can add more to the game and its characters.

I mentioned earlier that this game offers too few content but then they decide to include micro transactions. They can be obtained either by using real money or Fight Money, Street Fighter V’s currency and consists of alternate costumes, color palettes, stages and characters that would come as DLC. If that isn’t enough, Capcom has the gall to include a season pass… in a $60 full price game that offers barebones content. Just no. It’s unacceptable. If it were like Street Fighter IV then it would be okay but not here. I don’t accept it and even now that the place has been reduced to $30, it still isn’t enough. Had Capcom put more time and released it later down the line with more characters and modes, it would be better. But sadly it shot them in the foot and they paid the price for it.

Capcom may have dropped the ball big with Street Fighter V but it shouldn’t hinder anyone from taking the time to enjoy it. The presentation and gameplay are its high points but they can only last so long with its lack of content. Yes the game was released to please the competitive crowd and an audience is there for it but they did it at the expense of the casual crowd. Regardless, Street Fighter V is a well-designed game that anyone can enjoy… if only it could provide more for your money’s worth.

Had I reviewed this game when it was first released, my rating for it would be less than what it should deserve. For the time being, I give Street Fighter V a 6 out of 10.

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS Review

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

In 2015, Super Mario Maker was released for the Nintendo Wii U. For the first time ever, players were given the opportunity to create their own Mario levels and share them with players online all over the world. The game was a huge hit and creators went wild, coming up with levels that amaze while pushing players to their limits. A year later, Nintendo announced that Super Mario Maker will be coming to the Nintendo 3DS. Now that it has been released, does this game hold well to its Wii U counterpart?

If you played Super Mario Maker on the Wii U, you’ll feel real familiar with this game on the 3DS. Creating levels are easy to do with the bottom screen while the top serves as your platform. Pretty nifty. However like the Wii U version, you won’t have everything unlocked from the get-go. One difference this version has over the other is the Super Mario Challenge. It’s a mode exclusive for the Nintendo 3DS version and you tackle 18 worlds containing more than 100 courses. All the courses carry objectives and they can range from like collecting all 100 coins to gaining a set number of 1-Ups. This adds a bit of variety and challenge while teaching players how to use specific items to complete courses. The Super Mario Challenge can take players around 8-10 hours if they want to obtain 100% completion. The 100-Mario Challenge is also in this game and like the Wii U version they come in multiple difficulties, adding more hours of game time.

For a 3DS game, they nailed this port well. Very well I might add. Design-wise, the game is like the Wii U version and I will admit, seeing the old school Mario Bros. style in a handheld is real cool along with the others. However when it comes to the New Super Mario Bros. U style, it feels a bit blocky. Not that it’s a bad thing but since you’re playing a handheld port of a Wii U game it’s to be expected. But it’s pretty solid and I commend Nintendo for pulling it off. I only wish they could fix it so it can work but hey, what can you do?

Though this game is similar to the Wii U version, there are some things that differentiate it. First, there’s no Amiibo compatibility with the game. My guess it was due to game limitations but it’s pretty minor. Second is that you can’t share your courses online. The 3DS version gives you the option to share your courses but only through Local Play. In addition you can have other players edit your shared courses. If you have friends then this is a good thing but honestly, having that instead of sharing online hurts the game in the long run. It hurts because without the option to share online, it sort of reduces the value this game has over the Wii U version. I feel it’s a missed opportunity for Nintendo to make this game be just as awesome as the Wii U version. Sadly they didn’t and it hurts. That’s not to say the game is bad though. Also it’s recommended that the game is played on the New Nintendo 3DS handhelds. Original 3DS handhelds can handle the game but more likely than not, the game can crash. A minor issue at best.

Super Mario Maker for the Nintendo 3DS could have given Nintendo an opportunity to bring their most successful game onto the handheld. Despite the game playing just as good as the Wii U counterpart, it lacked a few things that differentiate it. But regardless Super Mario Maker for the 3DS is an enjoyable game that offers a lot for $40. I enjoyed this game, despite the drawbacks. But if you want the full experience, the Wii U version is your best bet but the 3DS does stand out on its own as a good game.

I give Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS a 7 out of 10.