Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World Review

Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided for this review by Nintendo.

In 2015, a little game called Yoshi’s Woolly World came out on the Wii U. It was a nice game that was fun for both kids and adults, following in the same way as Kirby’s Epic Yarn. Two years later, Nintendo decides to port this title over to the Nintendo 3DS and call it Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World. Despite being similar, the question is if the game has something that can stand out from its Wii U counterpart. The answer is yes.

Let’s start with the story and it’s straightforward. Life on Craft Island is peaceful until Kamek comes in and decides to turn all the Yarn Yoshis into wonder wool. Only a green and red Yarn Yoshi survived, despite their best efforts in trying to stop Kamek. So now the two remaining Yoshis must travel to stop Kamek and save their friends. It’s a pretty simple story and a good introduction for players to get into the game.

If you’ve played any of the Yoshi games, you will feel right at home here. You play as a Yoshi, traveling through six worlds each consisting of 8-9 stages. Yoshi can run, jump, ground/hammer pound and toss yarn balls at enemies. He can also absorb enemies and spit them out to form yarn balls. Collectibles are abounding in each stage such as Wonder Wool, pencil coins, hearts and Smiley Flowers. Wonder Wool is for acquiring new Yoshis and flowers help unlock an additional “S” stage at the end. Getting 100% completion requires you to find everything and the game do allow you to explore, which is good. The game also has badges where depending on a number of beads can add a bit of advantage for Yoshi. They range from having all big yarn balls to helping you find hidden stuff. It’s really cool. The controls are spot on and you have the option to customize them to your liking. If you plan on going for 100%, it can take you roughly 10-15 hours.

The worlds all follow a traditional pattern like grasslands, desert, skies, etc. but it’s all done pretty well and you can tell too. With the idea of yarn gives the game the opportunity to express itself. Design wise, it is exactly as the Wii U version. Nintendo should be commended for pulling off a port like this. I was surprised because the 3DS handheld can be quite limited but Nintendo has always provided games that push the potential of their systems to their limits. This is no exception. Also, the game runs a solid 30fps on regular 3DS/2DS and 60fps on New 3DS handhelds. Both handhelds run the game fine so no matter what you play, it is good all the same.

But despite this, there are several things that this game has over the Wii U counterpart. For starters, there is no co-op at all. A minor nitpick but the game is just as fun. Also, Amiibo functionality is aplenty here but expanded further giving Yoshi access to even more designs. The Poochy amiibo released for the game can also be used here to help bring Poochy to the game so you can use it to help find hidden goodies. Speaking of Poochy, this game also includes a Gold Rush mode, exclusive to the 3DS version, where you can ride Poochy along and collect beads. Using the Poochy amiibo turns it into a time attack mode as well. This game also has the option to switch between Classic and Mellow Mode. Think of Mellow Mode as an easy mode with Yoshi gaining wings and his yarn balls are replaced with Poochy-Pups. They are exclusive to the 3DS version as they can help you find hidden items and plus they don’t go away. After throwing one, they come back. If you feel the game can be difficult at times, Mellow Mode is the mode and the game doesn’t punish you for using it. Plus you can change modes at anytime.

I couldn’t find anything wrong with the game. The game’s pretty solid, the music is relaxing and nice to listen to and it offers plenty for your money’s worth. So yeah, the game is good. Very good with a high amount of replay value to boot.

Overall Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World took the Wii U version and added a few things that help make it stand out. It is the same but with more Amiibo functionality, the option to change modes on the fly and some additional modes make the game feel different and satisfying. If you were unable to try this when it came out for the Wii U, then this is a definite guarantee. I recommend this game. Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World is worth your money.

I give Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World a 9 out of 10. This game earns my personal Seal of Approval. Worth every penny.

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

Where do I even start with Metroid? Released in 1986, it was a groundbreaking game that introduced many features that would be mainstays for the franchise. It also gave us the first female protagonist in gaming history, Samus Aran. Metroid spawned eleven games. Many of them like Metroid Prime became glorified hits. Though it has had some rough edges, it’s a franchise where it’s games are always a delight to enjoy. The year 2016 would see Metroid resurface once more but it ha been mired in controversy. I speak of Metroid Prime: Federation Force a game that was subject to hate from everyone, considering that it was Metroid’s 30th anniversary. But does it really deserve the hate it got or is this game worth giving a chance?

The game takes place after Metroid Prime 3: Corruption with the threat of Phazon having been eradicated from the galaxy. Trouble is brewing within the Bermuda system and the Space Pirates, reeling from their previous defeat are planning something big. To counter the inevitable threat, the Galactic Federation forms a task force to stop them. It’s a straightforward story that does have some interesting twists but overall, it’s all right at best. What is surprising is that the focus is shifted away from Samus Aran. Instead it centers on the Galactic Federation. Sure Samus does make appearances in the game but it’s a surprising change compared to what we normally see.

Federation Force plays similarly to the Metroid Prime games where you explore, shoot things, etc. On a handheld, I say they emulated it rather well. The game is a mission-based adventure where you travel to one of three planets and complete objectives that the G.F gives you. You operate a giant Federation mech that you use to explore planets, shoot space pirates and complete missions. Controls are very solid, just like in the Prime games. They can take a while to get used to because it’s a Metroid game on a handheld but it’s well done.

Gyro controls help make your aim precise and that’s a good thing. I didn’t have any issues with them. Most games didn’t incorporate these controls well enough but for a game like this, it’s done pretty well. You can use analog controls if you feel they can be tiresome.

Speaking of the mech, you have the option to customize it however you like with different chips. They provide unique effects, giving opportunities for experimentation. Be warned that they can break, aside from one that can’t be broken. Also you can decide what weapons you can use like missiles, beams, etc. Depending on the mission you’ll have to decide carefully. Oh and you can also have your mech get a paint job. It’s cosmetic but it’s pretty cool.

In the presentation style, the game is acceptable. Having three different settings give the game a bit of variety. Sure it’s traditional cause you have an ice planet, a desert planet and a factory planet but they shouldn’t stop you from taking in the scenery. Due to the game’s mission structure, your exploration is limited but it won’t stop you from finding stuff like secrets. There are plenty and can unlock new stuff for your mech such as chips and paint jobs.

Federation Force’s campaign mode can take you roughly 8-10 hours, depending if you play it by yourself or with friends. Yes, the campaign has both offline and online co-op. Now that’s a good thing since with friends, it helps alleviate the game’s shortcomings and plus, it’s more fun if you have friends by your side blasting space pirates. The game’s built with co-op in mind and it’s done real well. Solo however can be a pain and depending on mission structure, it can get problematic. There is a high amount of replay value as you can go back to previous missions to get high scores and medals if you’re skilled enough. It’s even higher with friends.

In addition the campaign, there’s also Blast Ball. Think of it as soccer but with mechs, 3-on-3. Your job is to score three points while preventing your opponents from scoring. It’s an okay mode at best and doesn’t offer anything else. Once you play it for a bit, you get an idea and it can be kind of boring. Not much to say on that. Federation Force has Amiibo support but it only works on both Samus and Zero Suit Samus. They provide new paint jobs with added advantages. It’s okay at best.

In spite of some good things this has, there’s a bit of bad. The music isn’t as interesting as previous Metroid titles. They don’t have the kind of hook that gets you to listen to them. I would sum the music up as forgetful. Also since the game puts focus on the Galactic Federation, Samus gets downplayed. For the sake of spoilers, I feel that Samus should have been utilized more in the game. Heck having her be an unlockable after beating it would have been nice. But I feel that this leaves a lot to be desired. It also doesn’t help that this game was released to coincide with Metroid’s 30th anniversary. Having this to celebrate a franchise like Metroid just turns off a lot of people. Sadly it did and not a lot of people got to play it.

I’ll be fair. Metroid Prime: Federation Force is a welcome addition to the franchise. The gameplay is solid and the presentation is well done. But its many flaws hinder the game from reaching its full potential. Fans of the franchise do deserve a better Metroid game and sadly this isn’t it. But with the game not doing well sales-wise, the future is uncertain. I only wish Nintendo can provide us a proper Metroid game… instead of this.

This took me half a year to do and I had to think about this well. However I will give the benefit of the doubt to this game. Metroid Prime: Federation Force gets a 6 out of 10 from me.

Street Fighter V Review

Street Fighter V Review – Written by Jose Vega

Purchased my copy at full price for the sake of this review.

For almost 30 years, Street Fighter was the series that gave new life to the fighting game genre. Whether it’s the memorable characters, music or its tight gameplay, it brought us so much that fans still enjoy to this day. It’s previous entry Street Fighter IV provided so much, despite the game getting numerous updates and revisions. Last year, Capcom was ready to bring Street Fighter into the next gaming generation with Street Fighter V, released as a Sony exclusive for PS4 and PC. The question looms… does it deliver the same way SFIV had all those years ago or will this game crash and burn to the ground? Considering that it’s almost a year since the game’s release, I am going to be reviewing the game in its current state.

The Street Fighter series has never been known for it’ story. This game’s no exception. The story is split between “Character Story” and the Cinematic Story that was released in June as a free update. But to summarize, M. Bison of Shadaloo enacts his plan for world domination and he does so with the Black Moons. Now several groups are gathering to put a stop to Bison’s plans but many may be having plans of their own. The story is pretty predictable, your traditional “stop the bad guy before they take over the world” thing. Nothing fancy. Considering that this is set in-between Street Fighter IV and III, it does explain certain events that we would see in later games. The character story mode however consist of short segments that last 6-10 minutes but provide a bit of exposition for all the characters involved. They’re harmless fun but at least you get an idea of what the characters are and their motivations.

Street Fighter V doesn’t offer much in terms of content. Later updates did include modes like Challenges but when it was first released, the game provided little. It makes the game feel barebones. I find it disappointing. Many other fighting games like Mortal Kombat, Tekken and Smash Bros. offer a lot of content and variety at full price and the most important thing is having content for people that just want to pick up and play. To see that it doesn’t have that is upsetting and will only drive consumers away. I am aware that the game was released for the competitive crowd but unless there’s something for casuals, it’ll be a failure from the get go. There is online play but when it was first released, it had numerous server issues that hindered the experience. They did fix it eventually but overall, Street Fighter V is barebones on release and to this day, it still is. Capcom dropped the ball and they should have put a bit more time in refining the game to make it complete.

Despite the negatives, Street Fighter V is great in terms of graphics and gameplay. The game looks amazing, a step up from Street Fighter IV. From a design standpoint, it’s well done. The character models are better but for some reason, they seem a bit too muscular. All the stages are vibrant and colorful, backing it up with music. SFV’s high point also includes the music. The music is very good and some tracks are real addicting to listen to. Thankfully you have the option to switch between stage and character music so that’s a plus.

If you’ve played a previous Street Fighter game then you’ll feel right at home. The controls are the same but there are a few noticeable changes. For starters, everyone has a Critical Art, a V-Trigger and V-Reversal. They are the game’s main gimmicks. Each character has a specific V-Trigger and Reversal ability that sets them apart from the others. They depend on the character and can make matches pretty intense. I can say that Capcom did do a good job at making the controls easier for newcomers but can also be challenging for competitive players. Compared to Street Fighter IV’s battle system, this is a bit easier. Though I wish that the game could allow players to choose from a variety of V-Trigger/Reversal and Critical Arts. It can add more to the game and its characters.

I mentioned earlier that this game offers too few content but then they decide to include micro transactions. They can be obtained either by using real money or Fight Money, Street Fighter V’s currency and consists of alternate costumes, color palettes, stages and characters that would come as DLC. If that isn’t enough, Capcom has the gall to include a season pass… in a $60 full price game that offers barebones content. Just no. It’s unacceptable. If it were like Street Fighter IV then it would be okay but not here. I don’t accept it and even now that the place has been reduced to $30, it still isn’t enough. Had Capcom put more time and released it later down the line with more characters and modes, it would be better. But sadly it shot them in the foot and they paid the price for it.

Capcom may have dropped the ball big with Street Fighter V but it shouldn’t hinder anyone from taking the time to enjoy it. The presentation and gameplay are its high points but they can only last so long with its lack of content. Yes the game was released to please the competitive crowd and an audience is there for it but they did it at the expense of the casual crowd. Regardless, Street Fighter V is a well-designed game that anyone can enjoy… if only it could provide more for your money’s worth.

Had I reviewed this game when it was first released, my rating for it would be less than what it should deserve. For the time being, I give Street Fighter V a 6 out of 10.

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS Review

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

In 2015, Super Mario Maker was released for the Nintendo Wii U. For the first time ever, players were given the opportunity to create their own Mario levels and share them with players online all over the world. The game was a huge hit and creators went wild, coming up with levels that amaze while pushing players to their limits. A year later, Nintendo announced that Super Mario Maker will be coming to the Nintendo 3DS. Now that it has been released, does this game hold well to its Wii U counterpart?

If you played Super Mario Maker on the Wii U, you’ll feel real familiar with this game on the 3DS. Creating levels are easy to do with the bottom screen while the top serves as your platform. Pretty nifty. However like the Wii U version, you won’t have everything unlocked from the get-go. One difference this version has over the other is the Super Mario Challenge. It’s a mode exclusive for the Nintendo 3DS version and you tackle 18 worlds containing more than 100 courses. All the courses carry objectives and they can range from like collecting all 100 coins to gaining a set number of 1-Ups. This adds a bit of variety and challenge while teaching players how to use specific items to complete courses. The Super Mario Challenge can take players around 8-10 hours if they want to obtain 100% completion. The 100-Mario Challenge is also in this game and like the Wii U version they come in multiple difficulties, adding more hours of game time.

For a 3DS game, they nailed this port well. Very well I might add. Design-wise, the game is like the Wii U version and I will admit, seeing the old school Mario Bros. style in a handheld is real cool along with the others. However when it comes to the New Super Mario Bros. U style, it feels a bit blocky. Not that it’s a bad thing but since you’re playing a handheld port of a Wii U game it’s to be expected. But it’s pretty solid and I commend Nintendo for pulling it off. I only wish they could fix it so it can work but hey, what can you do?

Though this game is similar to the Wii U version, there are some things that differentiate it. First, there’s no Amiibo compatibility with the game. My guess it was due to game limitations but it’s pretty minor. Second is that you can’t share your courses online. The 3DS version gives you the option to share your courses but only through Local Play. In addition you can have other players edit your shared courses. If you have friends then this is a good thing but honestly, having that instead of sharing online hurts the game in the long run. It hurts because without the option to share online, it sort of reduces the value this game has over the Wii U version. I feel it’s a missed opportunity for Nintendo to make this game be just as awesome as the Wii U version. Sadly they didn’t and it hurts. That’s not to say the game is bad though. Also it’s recommended that the game is played on the New Nintendo 3DS handhelds. Original 3DS handhelds can handle the game but more likely than not, the game can crash. A minor issue at best.

Super Mario Maker for the Nintendo 3DS could have given Nintendo an opportunity to bring their most successful game onto the handheld. Despite the game playing just as good as the Wii U counterpart, it lacked a few things that differentiate it. But regardless Super Mario Maker for the 3DS is an enjoyable game that offers a lot for $40. I enjoyed this game, despite the drawbacks. But if you want the full experience, the Wii U version is your best bet but the 3DS does stand out on its own as a good game.

I give Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS a 7 out of 10.

My Top 10 Games of 2016

2016 has been a rather unexpected year when it comes to gaming. We’ve had good games, bad games, disappointing games and games that end up getting canned for one reason or another. Regardless, it’s time for a list and it’s not going to be an easy one. I’m not limiting this to just Nintendo games. I’m involving all sorts of games so without further ado, these are my Top 10 Games of 2016.

Word of warning for everyone… if you find that a game you like isn’t on the list, you are welcome to make your own and share it. I won’t judge you and remember, the only opinion that should ever matter is your own.

Let us begin.

10) Song of the Deep – PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC

Kicking off the list we have Song of the Deep, developed and published by Insomniac Games. Song of the Deep is basically Metroid but in an underwater style. I will admit. This game had me intrigued because of its design and presentation. When I got to play it, it was a sight to behold. The presentation for it is incredible with the level of detail to be intense. It’s gameplay leaves a lot to be desired but it fits the world that this game is. Not to mention it’s a bit too simple and short, around 4 hours. I’ll cut some slack since the game is rather cheap and there’s replay value to back it up. This game deserves a bit more appreciation. Sure it’s not the best but for what it’s worth, it’s a soothing and satisfying experience. I recommend that you pick the game up, at least to see for yourself how good it is. It’s $10! It’s not the best but I feel that it deserves to be #10 on my list.

9) Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS – Nintendo 3DS

To think that Nintendo would take a risk and bring a game like this to their best-selling handheld is a challenge onto itself. But for its shortcomings, I say that they did a good job. Mario Maker for 3DS is what it is, a port of a game that was on Wii U now fit on the handheld. Nothing more. Nothing less. The only problems I have with the game is that there’s no Amiibo functionality, you can’t play others courses or share courses online and the only way you can share them is through its Streetpass function. But despite its negatives, the game is still really fun and can even push your skills as a gamer/level creator to the test. Had this game allowed you to share courses online and play others’ from the get-go, it’d be rated higher. I recommend playing this on a New 3DS XL because, on a regular 3DS, you can experience crashes. I just want to give you a heads up.

8) Final Fantasy XV – PlayStation 4, Xbox One (PC coming soon)

We waited a long time for this game. It originally was going to be part of the Fabula Nova Crystalis as Final Fantasy Versus XIII. Unfortunately, it was scrapped and then replaced with this. The wait was long but in the end is worth it. Final Fantasy XV is a great game. Its strong points are the gameplay, the open world location and the many things you can do in this said world. My problems with the game are its lackluster story and the characters. The four protagonists are fleshed out well enough but everything else feels flat. Made worse is that in order to better understand this, you need to watch stuff that’s outside the game like the film Kingsglaive and OVA Brotherhood. Other than that, I couldn’t find anything else wrong but at least Square-Enix is dedicated to making the game better while filling up story bits that should have been added. Thankfully I’m happy with that and it shows that they really want to make the game feel complete. I recommend giving this game a chance. Besides once the negatives are pushed aside, you have a game that’s very satisfying.

7) Overwatch – PlayStation 4, Xbox One and PC

Blizzard has a lot of balls for trying their luck in the first-person shooter genre and it paid off considerably with this game. Overwatch is just that: a first-person shooter game where you and five others can take the fight against the opposition in various modes. They range from escort/stop the payload to capturing defensive points/objectives on the map. Okay. It’s a bit small but that’s not why it’s on the list. Overwatch’s strong points are its setting and characters. No two characters are similar. Each character offers something different and that’s what makes it good. Coupled with the fact that there’s a lot to do in this game, it’s nuts. We already got two new characters, a whole bunch of new modes and events and knowing what 2017 has in store, it’s going to get better. This game is better played if you have friends because it’s all the more satisfying when you achieve victory. I ask you… are you with me?

6) Paper Mario: Color Splash – Nintendo Wii U

I know what you’re thinking. Why is this game on the list? Let me explain. Sure this game uses the same style as Paper Mario: Sticker Star but that’s pretty much it. Why it’s on my list because it is a much better game. Design wise, it is awesome. It is a step up from the previous game and the theme involving paint and colors adds it in perfectly. You can tell when you travel through Prisma Island. The addition of restoring the world through paint offers something different. Using cards instead of stickers is a lot better. The humor this game has is spot on with some being very funny to listen. Color Splash offers a lot here and I say it is miles better especially since it’s released on a system that’s on its deathbed. I only wish that Nintendo could go back to its roots with the game offering what it should be, instead of this. But for what it’s worth, I say it’s a must buy. Truthfully it is a must buy and I recommend this game.

Enjoying the list so far? Good because we’re now reaching the halfway point of this list. There’s no going back for us now.

5) Fire Emblem Fates – Nintendo 3DS

Three years after the release of Fire Emblem: Awakening, we get a game that not only is good but offers so much. I’m talking about Fire Emblem Fates and I speak on behalf of everything the game offers. What’s different from the previous games is its branching campaigns. You play as Corrin, a young noble who was born in the kingdom of Hoshido but was raised by the kingdom of Nohr. When both kingdoms declare war on each other, you have to make a choice on whose family you would side. Should you side with Hoshido, the kingdom you were born in as your Birthright. Should you side with Nohr, the kingdom that raised you and follows the side of Conquest. Or will you choose neither side and instead work to have both kingdoms unite under one banner and learn of a Revelation that threatens all. That is what makes the game stand out. The three campaigns: Birthright, Conquest, and Revelation offer hours of gameplay and customization that can drive you nuts. Replay value here is through the roof, along with additional content via DLC drives it even further. I won’t go into too much detail but if you haven’t picked up this game, you should. I recommend trying your luck to get the Special Edition of the game, which has all 3 campaigns in one DLC. But if you are getting either Birthright or Conquest, expect to spend a lot just to get the rest. It’s why this game gets the #5 on my slot on this list.

4) Gravity Rush Remastered – PlayStation 4

In 2012, a game called Gravity Rush was released on the PlayStation Vita. It was a game that was fun, different and offered something new. Sadly not many people got to play it due to being released on a handheld that Sony never gave a damn about. Four years later, SCE Studio and Project Siren bring this game over to the PlayStation 4 and my god, it is incredible. Gravity Rush Remastered is marvelous. Seeing the game in glorious HD is jaw dropping. It’s nuts! What’s even better is that it runs at a solid 60 frames per second. Flawless 60fps. It is perfect. They also refined the game’s controls making things such as sliding across the city seamless. You can use the back buttons on the PS4 controller but there’s also the option to use the DualShock 4’s motion controls so it offers some variety for players. What’s even better is that the Remastered port includes all the DLC for the game and at a price of $30, how can you say no to that? You simply can’t.

This game is what made the PlayStation Vita stand out but now that it’s on a PS4, it’s the go-to game for anyone wanting this console. I highly recommend it. It is a must buy, without a doubt and it should prep anyone for the eventual release of Gravity Rush 2 coming in January.

3) Shantae: Half-Genie Hero – Nintendo Wii U, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation Vita and PC

WayForward should be praised and commended for making a game like this. Not a lot of people are going to like having this as my #3 spot but this is a perfect example of a Kickstarter campaign done right, aside from Shovel Knight. Shantae: Half-Genie Hero is amazing. There is so much good to say here such as the presentation. Design-wise, it’s a step up from the previous game. 2.5D at its finest with the character models being at its absolute best. Jake Kaufman does it again with the music here and all the tracks are addicting to listen to. Very addicting. The gameplay is similar to the first two games but it’s improved and easy enough for anyone to pick up and play. Hopefully, with the upcoming DLC like Risky Boots’ campaign, Half-Genie Hero is going to be one that’s worth every penny. Show love to WayForward. Get this game now!

2) Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney Spirit of Justice – Nintendo 3DS

The Ace Attorney series has endured for more than 15 years with a strong and devoted following. 2013’s Dual Destinies is one a lot of people were hyped for and though nowadays is a bit mixed it was a welcome addition. Three years later, Phoenix Wright returns in full force with the sixth game in the main franchise: Spirit of Justice. Similar to the previous entries, it’s a visual novel style game where as Phoenix Wright (or any of the others like Apollo & Athena) you must investigate witnesses, find evidence and discover the truth through the courts. This time around, the story takes Phoenix to the Kingdom of Khura’in and in that country, defense attorneys are outlawed. Spirit of Justice introduces the Divination Seances where it details the last thing the victim sees before they pass on. But the truth isn’t always black and white. That’s where we come in to figure out if what the victim sees is the truth or not.

Many staples that are prevalent in the previous entries return here but its biggest points are its story and music. The story is a bit dark and intense for a game like this and the music is still its shining moment. Believe me, there are some tracks that are incredible to listen to. Whereas Dual Destinies serves as a return to form for the well-respected attorney, Spirit of Justice serves as a passing of the torch for Apollo Justice, allowing him to take the spotlight he deserves. It’s reason enough why this gets the #2 spot.

1) Pokémon Sun & Moon – Nintendo 3DS

Some people like the game, others didn’t. To tell you the truth, I enjoyed the game. As a fan of Pokémon since Generation 1, I had a lot of expectations. They paid off when it came out. Nintendo, GameFreak & The Pokemon Company took a lot of risks in making this stand out over the previous generations. Removing some staples like Gyms, HMs seems crazy when you think about it. However, when I got to play it for myself, I can say is wow… they nailed it. The game does hold your hand a lot at times but you do get the chance to explore at your leisure. The Island Challenges are interesting and provide something different instead of going to a gym and earning a badge. It’s emphasized a lot and I like it personally. Z-Moves are also cool and how they look is amazing. But if I were to net any nitpicks, it’s the story. That leaves a lot to be desired. I wish it can improve but at least the game is still the way you remember it.

Pokemon Sun & Moon may not be for everyone but for those that put the time into it, it’s a pretty awesome game. I recommend it and yes, it’s one that I feel should be #1 on my list.

Honorable Mentions: Azure Striker Gunvolt 2, Pokken Tournament, Yo-Kai Watch 2 Bony Spirits & Fleshy Souls, Ratchet & Clank PS4, Kirby: Planet Robobot

That’s pretty much it for this list. Remember, my list is 100% opinionated and you are welcome to disagree with me. If you guys have a list of your own Top 10s or if you feel that a game you played should be on the list, let me know in the comments. I look forward to hearing from everyone.

 

BlazBlue: Central Fiction Review

BlazBlue: Central Fiction Review – Written by Jose Vega

Purchased copy for the sake of this review.

Since 2009, Blazblue is one of these franchises that bring something unique to the fighting game genre. For almost eight years, the series has been through a lot despite following the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” mentality. Now in 2016, the fourth game in the series arrives with Blazblue Central Fiction. Originally released in the arcades, the game is now here on consoles. The question is if a fourth hurrah will be the one that will give the series glory or if this will be the last?

Blazblue is one of these games where the plot can be as ridiculous as its characters. Continuing from the events of Chronophantasma, the story centers on a mysterious embryo in the sky and signs that foretell the end of the world coming. Trying to explain it would be complicated but it’s what Blazblue is. It’s not much of a bad thing but there are some moments where it goes into the territory of absurdity. Longtime fans that have played the previous entries will have a good understanding of what will transpire. But for those that want to get into the series, the game provides a good summary of what happened, helping people get up to speed.

When you think about gameplay, it’s one of Blazblue’s high points. Fortunately it’s similar to the previous games so long time fans can feel right at home. However, this game has added some new mechanics while providing added changes. One such mechanic is the Exceed Accel, a kind of Distortion Drive that serves as a follow up to activating Overdrive. It deals a lot of pain but also ends Overdrive. Another feature they added is Active Flow, the opposite of Negative Penalty. Basically the more you attack and go on the offensive you get rewarded with boosted damage and Burst Gauge recovery. It also increases Exceed Accel damage. It’s a nice addition for players that put everything in their offense. Blazblue’s Drive system is still the staple of the series, providing each character with their own distinct skill. With over 35 characters to choose from, it can get hectic. But it’s a good thing obviously. All the cast from the previous games returns here along with some new ones.

Central Fiction has many modes for players to enjoy. You have your standard Arcade Mode like every other fighting game. However in the case of this, Arcade Mode is split into 3 acts. It’s because the Arcade version started with Act I and then updated twice, adding new playable characters and story. You have the option of choosing to do any act, depending on the character chosen. Story Mode takes you through the game’s story. It’s long and it’ll take you roughly 15-20 hours, more if you want to 100% it. Other modes include Tutorial, Training, Challenge, Versus, Score Attack and Abyss. They provide a lot more time into the game. Replay value is very high with some of these modes. Online Play is well done. You can either go to a Ranked Match, Player Match or a Lobby. Lobbies are easy to set up and can hold a lot of players. Sometimes online matches can lag but it’s seamless and well done. There’s also customization with so many different options you can have to set yourself apart from other players. So many things to unlock that it raises the replay value even higher. Design wise, the game is beautiful. Many of the stages are vibrant, colorful and add a lot to the areas you battle. Sure some of them are reused from previous games but seeing them all in 1080p is simply a sight to behold. For a 2D fighting game, it’s awesome. The music is real awesome. Some characters have themes that really rock and are addicting to listen to. It’s a game like this where I really want to buy the soundtrack for it and I recommend it.

There are some glaring faults Central Fiction has in spite of its positives. One of the biggest is of a lack of English Dub. Central Fiction is the first and only game in the franchise where at release there is no English dub, only Japanese. Rvery other game in the series always had both an English and Japanese dub. This doesn’t and it caused a bit of problems for fans. So much so that a petition was made to convince both Arc System Works and Aksys Games to release an English dub down the line. It’s disappointing there’s no English dub at launch but I hope that they’ll deliver it down the line. Also, it’s not a game like Blazblue without micro transactions. Most are purely cosmetic and minor but characters such as Es and Mai Natsume require money. They’ve done it before in previous installments with other characters but it’s upsetting that you need to pay to unlock them. I have nothing wrong with micro transactions if they’re done right but if its done in a way like that, no way.

Despite some negatives, Blazblue Central Fiction is a game that provides so much to do at full price. You have refined gameplay, a cast of over 30 characters, a story mode that can get you engaging, very strong online and various modes that offer a lot of replay value. Overall it’s a package that provides so much in one game. In a way, it feels complete. Truly. Had this game include an English dub from the start, I would rate it higher. Regardless for a fourth entry in the series, I can say that this is the best one. If you haven’t got a chance to pick this game up, now is the time.

I give Blazblue: Central Fiction an 8 out of 10.

December 2016 State of YouTube Address

I figure I would have to post this eventually but yeah, it’s time for the State of YouTube Address on my channel.

This is very important so if you haven’t seen it then go watch it right now.

My new and improved YT Blog