Tag Archives: 3DS

Pokemon Sun & Pokemon Moon Review

Pokémon Sun & Moon Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided for this review by Nintendo.

There’s an old adage we always say, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Pokémon has always been like that for over twenty years, providing the same concept through multiple generations. Now we reach Generation 7 with the arrival of Pokémon Sun & Pokémon Moon. It has been said that the game is going to be different than the previous generations. Will the game carry the same enjoyable experience or will the changes make this be something else?

The story is set in the region of Alola, based off of Hawaii. It focuses on a young individual who just moved from Kanto with his mom to Alola. With help from his uncle Prof. Kukui, the trainer embarks on a journey to become the strongest trainer in the region. There’s also another plot revolving Lillie and a Pokémon of hers named Nebby who’s on the run from a shady organization. Most of the story’s told through scenes that occur during your journey. It’s done well though I feel the story regarding Lillie can be improved a bit, not that it’s a bad thing.

All Pokémon games have had the same gameplay since the beginning. But this time, Nintendo & the Pokémon Company decide to take a gamble and provide a different experience for players. The gameplay is the same where you travel all over a region to catch Pokémon and use them to battle, other trainers. If you’ve played previous Pokémon handheld games, it’s straightforward. In the case of Sun & Moon, how you go about your journey is different. Gone are the usual gym leaders and in its place comes the Island Challenge.

In the Island Challenge, you travel from one island to the next completing various Island Trials. The Island Trials are missions where you tackle specific objectives before you take on the Island Totem Pokémon in an SOS battle. The Totem Pokémon will sometimes bring ally Pokémon to fight alongside it. After beating the Totem Pokémon, you complete the trial. Some islands will have more than one Trial and they need to be completed in order to reach the Grand Trial. Grand Trials are like gym battles where you take on the Island Kahuna. Beating them will complete the trial and you will move on to the next island.

I personally love the Island Challenges. Instead of battling, you have to do objectives to move on from one trial to the next. It helps the game feel fresh and different while keeping everything the same and I hope that future Pokémon games can follow this style. Not only that they have removed gyms but also HMs. Replacing HMs is the Ride Pager, giving you access to Ride Pokémon that can help trek through Alola. A welcome addition to the game and one that is quite fun to have.

Another addition is Z-Moves. As you journey through Alola, you’ll acquire Z-Crystals that give your Pokémon access to super powered moves that can turn the tide of battle. However they can only be used once per battle, so be careful. A neat addition and can be helpful in a moment’s notice. You can also take pictures of Pokémon with your Pokedex and send them to get results. You get rewarded for it to boot.

The game is a long one and depending if players want to complete their Pokedex and have all the Pokémon, it can take a while. But for an estimate, the game will take roughly 30-40 hours, even longer especially when you can also trade and battle online adding the length to unbelievable levels. Speaking of which, the online has changed. You still have the usual GTS but the addition of the Festival Plaza allows players to meet other people and earn coins so they can use them to improve their plaza to make it better.

Presentation-wise, the game is a big step up from Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire. The characters look a lot better and the environment itself is vibrant and colorful. Battles are intense and though it reuses stuff from the previous game, I won’t complain. The Z-Moves themselves do look great. But if I were to find any nitpicks with the game, I feel the story needs a bit of work. Also the game can have a tendency to slow down when double battles occur. It mostly happens on a regular Nintendo 3DS but if you’re playing on a New Nintendo 3DS, the slowdown doesn’t happen. Considering that the game is pushing the 3DS hardware to its limits, it’s to be expected.

Pokémon Sun & Moon has breathed new life into the franchise, providing a familiar feel while also adding new features and innovations. Sure the story can be hit or miss but overall, it’s a satisfying experience. So much to do in the region of Alola that you can spend weeks or even months and with updates that allow players to transfer Pokémon from previous games to this one adds it even more. The franchise’s 20th Anniversary was a huge celebration and this game’s release certifies that this game franchise will be around for a long time to come.

I give Pokémon Sun & Pokémon Moon a perfect 10 out of 10. Legendary status and it’s worth your time and money.

Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World Review

Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided for this review by Nintendo.

In 2015, a little game called Yoshi’s Woolly World came out on the Wii U. It was a nice game that was fun for both kids and adults, following in the same way as Kirby’s Epic Yarn. Two years later, Nintendo decides to port this title over to the Nintendo 3DS and call it Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World. Despite being similar, the question is if the game has something that can stand out from its Wii U counterpart. The answer is yes.

Let’s start with the story and it’s straightforward. Life on Craft Island is peaceful until Kamek comes in and decides to turn all the Yarn Yoshis into wonder wool. Only a green and red Yarn Yoshi survived, despite their best efforts in trying to stop Kamek. So now the two remaining Yoshis must travel to stop Kamek and save their friends. It’s a pretty simple story and a good introduction for players to get into the game.

If you’ve played any of the Yoshi games, you will feel right at home here. You play as a Yoshi, traveling through six worlds each consisting of 8-9 stages. Yoshi can run, jump, ground/hammer pound and toss yarn balls at enemies. He can also absorb enemies and spit them out to form yarn balls. Collectibles are abounding in each stage such as Wonder Wool, pencil coins, hearts and Smiley Flowers. Wonder Wool is for acquiring new Yoshis and flowers help unlock an additional “S” stage at the end. Getting 100% completion requires you to find everything and the game do allow you to explore, which is good. The game also has badges where depending on a number of beads can add a bit of advantage for Yoshi. They range from having all big yarn balls to helping you find hidden stuff. It’s really cool. The controls are spot on and you have the option to customize them to your liking. If you plan on going for 100%, it can take you roughly 10-15 hours.

The worlds all follow a traditional pattern like grasslands, desert, skies, etc. but it’s all done pretty well and you can tell too. With the idea of yarn gives the game the opportunity to express itself. Design wise, it is exactly as the Wii U version. Nintendo should be commended for pulling off a port like this. I was surprised because the 3DS handheld can be quite limited but Nintendo has always provided games that push the potential of their systems to their limits. This is no exception. Also, the game runs a solid 30fps on regular 3DS/2DS and 60fps on New 3DS handhelds. Both handhelds run the game fine so no matter what you play, it is good all the same.

But despite this, there are several things that this game has over the Wii U counterpart. For starters, there is no co-op at all. A minor nitpick but the game is just as fun. Also, Amiibo functionality is aplenty here but expanded further giving Yoshi access to even more designs. The Poochy amiibo released for the game can also be used here to help bring Poochy to the game so you can use it to help find hidden goodies. Speaking of Poochy, this game also includes a Gold Rush mode, exclusive to the 3DS version, where you can ride Poochy along and collect beads. Using the Poochy amiibo turns it into a time attack mode as well. This game also has the option to switch between Classic and Mellow Mode. Think of Mellow Mode as an easy mode with Yoshi gaining wings and his yarn balls are replaced with Poochy-Pups. They are exclusive to the 3DS version as they can help you find hidden items and plus they don’t go away. After throwing one, they come back. If you feel the game can be difficult at times, Mellow Mode is the mode and the game doesn’t punish you for using it. Plus you can change modes at anytime.

I couldn’t find anything wrong with the game. The game’s pretty solid, the music is relaxing and nice to listen to and it offers plenty for your money’s worth. So yeah, the game is good. Very good with a high amount of replay value to boot.

Overall Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World took the Wii U version and added a few things that help make it stand out. It is the same but with more Amiibo functionality, the option to change modes on the fly and some additional modes make the game feel different and satisfying. If you were unable to try this when it came out for the Wii U, then this is a definite guarantee. I recommend this game. Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World is worth your money.

I give Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World a 9 out of 10. This game earns my personal Seal of Approval. Worth every penny.

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review

Metroid Prime: Federation Force Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

Where do I even start with Metroid? Released in 1986, it was a groundbreaking game that introduced many features that would be mainstays for the franchise. It also gave us the first female protagonist in gaming history, Samus Aran. Metroid spawned eleven games. Many of them like Metroid Prime became glorified hits. Though it has had some rough edges, it’s a franchise where it’s games are always a delight to enjoy. The year 2016 would see Metroid resurface once more but it ha been mired in controversy. I speak of Metroid Prime: Federation Force a game that was subject to hate from everyone, considering that it was Metroid’s 30th anniversary. But does it really deserve the hate it got or is this game worth giving a chance?

The game takes place after Metroid Prime 3: Corruption with the threat of Phazon having been eradicated from the galaxy. Trouble is brewing within the Bermuda system and the Space Pirates, reeling from their previous defeat are planning something big. To counter the inevitable threat, the Galactic Federation forms a task force to stop them. It’s a straightforward story that does have some interesting twists but overall, it’s all right at best. What is surprising is that the focus is shifted away from Samus Aran. Instead it centers on the Galactic Federation. Sure Samus does make appearances in the game but it’s a surprising change compared to what we normally see.

Federation Force plays similarly to the Metroid Prime games where you explore, shoot things, etc. On a handheld, I say they emulated it rather well. The game is a mission-based adventure where you travel to one of three planets and complete objectives that the G.F gives you. You operate a giant Federation mech that you use to explore planets, shoot space pirates and complete missions. Controls are very solid, just like in the Prime games. They can take a while to get used to because it’s a Metroid game on a handheld but it’s well done.

Gyro controls help make your aim precise and that’s a good thing. I didn’t have any issues with them. Most games didn’t incorporate these controls well enough but for a game like this, it’s done pretty well. You can use analog controls if you feel they can be tiresome.

Speaking of the mech, you have the option to customize it however you like with different chips. They provide unique effects, giving opportunities for experimentation. Be warned that they can break, aside from one that can’t be broken. Also you can decide what weapons you can use like missiles, beams, etc. Depending on the mission you’ll have to decide carefully. Oh and you can also have your mech get a paint job. It’s cosmetic but it’s pretty cool.

In the presentation style, the game is acceptable. Having three different settings give the game a bit of variety. Sure it’s traditional cause you have an ice planet, a desert planet and a factory planet but they shouldn’t stop you from taking in the scenery. Due to the game’s mission structure, your exploration is limited but it won’t stop you from finding stuff like secrets. There are plenty and can unlock new stuff for your mech such as chips and paint jobs.

Federation Force’s campaign mode can take you roughly 8-10 hours, depending if you play it by yourself or with friends. Yes, the campaign has both offline and online co-op. Now that’s a good thing since with friends, it helps alleviate the game’s shortcomings and plus, it’s more fun if you have friends by your side blasting space pirates. The game’s built with co-op in mind and it’s done real well. Solo however can be a pain and depending on mission structure, it can get problematic. There is a high amount of replay value as you can go back to previous missions to get high scores and medals if you’re skilled enough. It’s even higher with friends.

In addition the campaign, there’s also Blast Ball. Think of it as soccer but with mechs, 3-on-3. Your job is to score three points while preventing your opponents from scoring. It’s an okay mode at best and doesn’t offer anything else. Once you play it for a bit, you get an idea and it can be kind of boring. Not much to say on that. Federation Force has Amiibo support but it only works on both Samus and Zero Suit Samus. They provide new paint jobs with added advantages. It’s okay at best.

In spite of some good things this has, there’s a bit of bad. The music isn’t as interesting as previous Metroid titles. They don’t have the kind of hook that gets you to listen to them. I would sum the music up as forgetful. Also since the game puts focus on the Galactic Federation, Samus gets downplayed. For the sake of spoilers, I feel that Samus should have been utilized more in the game. Heck having her be an unlockable after beating it would have been nice. But I feel that this leaves a lot to be desired. It also doesn’t help that this game was released to coincide with Metroid’s 30th anniversary. Having this to celebrate a franchise like Metroid just turns off a lot of people. Sadly it did and not a lot of people got to play it.

I’ll be fair. Metroid Prime: Federation Force is a welcome addition to the franchise. The gameplay is solid and the presentation is well done. But its many flaws hinder the game from reaching its full potential. Fans of the franchise do deserve a better Metroid game and sadly this isn’t it. But with the game not doing well sales-wise, the future is uncertain. I only wish Nintendo can provide us a proper Metroid game… instead of this.

This took me half a year to do and I had to think about this well. However I will give the benefit of the doubt to this game. Metroid Prime: Federation Force gets a 6 out of 10 from me.

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS Review

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

In 2015, Super Mario Maker was released for the Nintendo Wii U. For the first time ever, players were given the opportunity to create their own Mario levels and share them with players online all over the world. The game was a huge hit and creators went wild, coming up with levels that amaze while pushing players to their limits. A year later, Nintendo announced that Super Mario Maker will be coming to the Nintendo 3DS. Now that it has been released, does this game hold well to its Wii U counterpart?

If you played Super Mario Maker on the Wii U, you’ll feel real familiar with this game on the 3DS. Creating levels are easy to do with the bottom screen while the top serves as your platform. Pretty nifty. However like the Wii U version, you won’t have everything unlocked from the get-go. One difference this version has over the other is the Super Mario Challenge. It’s a mode exclusive for the Nintendo 3DS version and you tackle 18 worlds containing more than 100 courses. All the courses carry objectives and they can range from like collecting all 100 coins to gaining a set number of 1-Ups. This adds a bit of variety and challenge while teaching players how to use specific items to complete courses. The Super Mario Challenge can take players around 8-10 hours if they want to obtain 100% completion. The 100-Mario Challenge is also in this game and like the Wii U version they come in multiple difficulties, adding more hours of game time.

For a 3DS game, they nailed this port well. Very well I might add. Design-wise, the game is like the Wii U version and I will admit, seeing the old school Mario Bros. style in a handheld is real cool along with the others. However when it comes to the New Super Mario Bros. U style, it feels a bit blocky. Not that it’s a bad thing but since you’re playing a handheld port of a Wii U game it’s to be expected. But it’s pretty solid and I commend Nintendo for pulling it off. I only wish they could fix it so it can work but hey, what can you do?

Though this game is similar to the Wii U version, there are some things that differentiate it. First, there’s no Amiibo compatibility with the game. My guess it was due to game limitations but it’s pretty minor. Second is that you can’t share your courses online. The 3DS version gives you the option to share your courses but only through Local Play. In addition you can have other players edit your shared courses. If you have friends then this is a good thing but honestly, having that instead of sharing online hurts the game in the long run. It hurts because without the option to share online, it sort of reduces the value this game has over the Wii U version. I feel it’s a missed opportunity for Nintendo to make this game be just as awesome as the Wii U version. Sadly they didn’t and it hurts. That’s not to say the game is bad though. Also it’s recommended that the game is played on the New Nintendo 3DS handhelds. Original 3DS handhelds can handle the game but more likely than not, the game can crash. A minor issue at best.

Super Mario Maker for the Nintendo 3DS could have given Nintendo an opportunity to bring their most successful game onto the handheld. Despite the game playing just as good as the Wii U counterpart, it lacked a few things that differentiate it. But regardless Super Mario Maker for the 3DS is an enjoyable game that offers a lot for $40. I enjoyed this game, despite the drawbacks. But if you want the full experience, the Wii U version is your best bet but the 3DS does stand out on its own as a good game.

I give Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS a 7 out of 10.

Mario Party Star Rush Review

Product provided by Nintendo. Special thanks to Nintendo for giving me this opportunity to cover this game.

Mario Party has always been known to be a game where you and a few friends can sit back, have fun and see how much hilarity can ensue amongst each other. The franchise hasn’t had much success in recent years. It started being a turn based game and has stuck from the first game all the way to Mario Party 8. However the game went in a different direction with the use of vehicle based movement in Mario Party 9 and the overreliance of Amiibo functionality in Mario Party 10. The franchise wasn’t limited to consoles. They tried their luck with handhelds. After the mixed reception of Mario Party Island Tour, Nintendo and Nd Cube try their luck with Mario Party Star Rush. Will it suffer the same fate as its previous entry or have they got something up their sleeve that’ll make it a well-needed hit?

Mario Party always had a formula that worked while adding little things to improve the game experience. In the case of Star Rush, the turn-based gameplay that has been a staple since the beginning has been removed completely. Instead once everyone roll the dice, they all move at the same time. You can also determine where you go before you move. This adds a layer of strategy but at the same time you need to be aware of what your opponents will do. It’s a matter of predicting the best course of action on the playing boards. If you want to make sure to have an advantage, careful planning is key. At first I didn’t like that they removed the turn-based gameplay but it grew on me over time. I like it. It saves me a lot of time while providing something fresh, new and fast paced. Future Mario Party games should implement this style. Imagine the craziness that can ensue with everyone moving at the same time, trying to reach where they need to be.

Star Rush has multiple modes for you to tackle with Toad Scramble as the main mode. Up to 4 players can play as a Toad and trek through various boards, gathering Mario characters as allies and taking on bosses in mini games to recover Power Stars. Each character has their own unique ability and dice and it can help turn the tide. You can have up to 4 ally characters in one time and having more allies mean more of an advantage. Bear in mind that it can be a disadvantage if your opponent has more allies than you so be careful.

Items are aplenty in this game though not as big as in the previous games but they do add something to the game that can be good or bad. It’s random and it’s what Mario Party boils down to in a nutshell. Mini games are also the name of the game in Mario Party and there are many. They depend on the control scheme. Some are simple using buttons and an analog stick (or d-pad) while others take advantage of the touch screen. It works, giving it variety. However some mini games can be a bit of a pain to do than others and depending if you either have a regular 3DS or a New 3DS XL then some can be without a doubt annoying due to the microphone.

In addition to Toad Scramble, there are other game modes. Coinathlon is a race where up to four players collect as many coins as they can in minute long designated coin mini games to progress through three laps. They get hectic and it comes in two modes: Free Play and Rival Race. Mario Shuffle is a two-player game that uses Amiibo functionality. Using Amiibo figures, players race across a one-way board to the goal with one going right, the other left. If you don’t have Amiibo, cardboard cutouts are used. Balloon Bash is like Toad Scramble but you collect coins and stars in a mini board with a turn limit and mini games. You can also play as any Mario character so that’s a plus. Rhythm Recital is where up to four players work together and play classic Mario tunes using the Touch Screen. Challenge Tower is a single player game where you have to climb a tower with LED Spaces on it. There are varying difficulties with some being harder than others. Last but not least is Boo’s Block Party, a puzzle game where you spin sides of a number block to earn points. If you move enough of the same block, they get sent to the other player. It’s addicting and challenging if you want to get the high score.

There’s a lot to do in the game and let’s face it. Half of the time you’re going to be spending it trying to complete the modes to level up. Star Rush has a leveling system where as you play, you earn points. Once you gain enough, you level up and unlock either a new mode or a new character. It’ll take hours trying to unlock everything and it can be quite a challenge. It can get a bit repetitive too having to do it over and over just to unlock everything. The game offers a lot but I wish there’d be something to alleviate things. But if I had any issues with it, it’s that most of the time you’ll be playing it in single player. If you want to play multiplayer, each of you must have your own 3DS and a copy of the game or the free Download Play that you can get on the eShop. It’s like Smash Bros. for 3DS.

Overall, I can say that Mario Party Star Rush improves the formula in some ways. Having a fast paced style where everyone plans their moves adds layers of strategy. Various modes add replayability plus with 4-player co-op equaling insanity. What else can I say? I know games should try to implement new things but this is a step in the right direction. If you have friends and a few 3DS handhelds, then you will have a fun time.

I give Mario Party Star Rush an 8 out of 10. It earns my personal SEAL OF APPROVAL.

Kirby: Planet Robobot Review

Kirby: Planet Robobot – A Review by Jose Vega

Bought my copy for the sake of both the review and playthrough.

There’s an old adage we always say… “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. It means that if something is successful or effective, there’s no need to change or replace it. That’s what it is with the Kirby series of games. Every Kirby game is always the same and that’s a good thing. What else is there other than playing with a pink puffball that can take abilities from his foes and use ‘em against them? Nothing. That’s what. But it isn’t the case with this game here, Kirby: Planet Robobot. The question is, will this game follow the adage or will it decide to do something no one would expect? That’s something you guys already know.

Stories in Kirby games are mostly minor at best but they seem to help the player provide something to get behind. In this case, Planet Robobot’s story involves an outside force invading Planet Popstar, referring to them as the Haltmann Works Company. Using the Access Ark as their base, they are able to invade the planet and mechanize it with machinery. Not even the likes of King Dedede and Meta Knight were able to stop this evil force. Upon waking from his nap, Kirby sees what had become of his home. So he decides to do something about it and heads off to send the invaders back to where they came from.

I’ll be fair. This story is simplistic, as it is for a Kirby game. It doesn’t need to be overly dramatic to make it good. It’s all straight forward. Fortunately as you play through story mode, you’ll meet other characters and be able to piece everything together. I won’t spoil anything but by the time you beat this, the story gets serious but it does leave you feeling relieved. I don’t mind it since all story in Kirby games make you feel like being in the world they live in and feeling you should do something.

If you played any previous Kirby games since their inception, you can guess how this game’s going to be. But for anyone who has never played a Kirby game, here’s the lowdown on what you should expect. The game’s a side-scrolling platformer. You play as Kirby, a pink puffball and you use him to reach from point A to point B, while contending with various threats. Simple right? Wrong. Kirby needs to use all his skills in order to reach the end. One of his most useful powers is the ability to suck in enemies and spit them out as projectiles. Sometimes you can swallow some enemies and in turn, you get the option to copy their ability. It’s what makes Kirby what he is. He’ll take what you throw at him and send it right back at ya! There are a total of 27 different abilities Kirby can wield against his enemies, providing many possibilities for you to take down your opposition. Some abilities are exclusive via Amiibo. I’ll explain that in a bit.

Anyway the game’s main gimmick centers on the Robobot Armor. You get your hands on it early in the game and believe me, it makes exploring the game that much sweeter. In addition to dishing out punch attacks, a double jump and a dash, by scanning specific enemies, the armor can transform giving you access to the scanned power. There are a total of 12 different forms the armor can adapt. Some examples include Fire, giving the armor directional flamethrowers and a fire dash, Spark that can be used to fire short blasts or it can be built up to fire a powerful beam, Cutter giving you access to giant retractable Metal Blades and so forth. Some armors are needed in order to solve puzzles and in some cases required for stage progression such as Jet as it turns the armor into a jet plane, turning part of the level into a 2D shooter. This I enjoy because it gives the game variety. Overall the Robobot Armor adds another layer into what makes Kirby very good.

Now as for the game itself, the story mode is split into six areas and each area consists of several acts. In each act, you job is to head from start to finish all while dealing with enemies and finding items such as Code Cubes and Stickers. Code Cubes are the equivalent to Triple Deluxe’s Sun Stones and they’re found in every level, save for the boss. They’re hidden in each level and you need to collect up to 3 in each act in order to access the boss room. But if you’re the collecting type, getting them all in each area unlocks the EX level and that has Code Cubes too. In truth, those levels will require you to be at your best if you want to complete them. The rewards are worth it I might add, especially if you want to get them all. The game also has stickers that you can collect and if you want to 100% the game, you need to get them all especially the rare stickers.

Boss fights in Planet Robobot are real good here. They are challenging enough to require some skill but they aren’t as difficult. Using the right ability, you’ll be able to wipe them out in minutes so be sure to plan well if you want to succeed. Of course you can be daring and try beating them without any powers. Like I said, it offers the option of going about how you handle the bosses. You’ll need it if you wish to go through this 4-6 hour campaign. But if you plan on completing the game and unlocking everything, it’ll take you about 6 hours, at best. Not a bad thing but in my opinion, it’s acceptable.

After beating the game however, you’ll have access to additional content similar to the previous game, Kirby: Triple Deluxe. Metaknightmare Returns allows you to play as Metaknight, Kirby’s rival. You use him to trek through all six areas and taking on stronger versions of the same bosses that were in story mode. The Arena is a boss rush mode where you battle all bosses from the game whereas True Arena is the ultimate test, taking on bosses that were in Metaknightmare Returns as Kirby. In addition, the game also includes 2 sub-games you and your friends can enjoy. Kirby 3D Rumble is a set of minigames where you guide a 3D version of Kirby against enemies. Pretty simple. Team Kirby Clash has a team of Kirbys battling enemies and working together. There are RPG elements as well. You can level up each of the four Kirbys and all of them have individual abilities that can support one another. You can play it either by yourself and 3 CPUs or with up to 4 friends with 4 3DS’s. It’s better that you play it with friends because it makes things satisfying.

Planet Robobot also has a very good soundtrack, with some tunes having some techno beats. Some songs are reused from previous Kirby games but I ain’t complaining. My personal favorite tunes are the boss themes such as “Haltman Works Elite Management” and “Dedede Three”. They’re really addicting songs that help make the battles intense and catchy at the same time. So much so that I listen to these two songs whenever I can. That tells you a game is good because when you have catchy music like that, it’s a solid hit.

I couldn’t find any negatives but at times some levels can really have you head scratching if you want to figure out how to reach certain areas. It’s a minor thing and sometimes you’ll forget that hidden places net you Code Cubes. It’s a reason why you got to look through every nook and cranny if you want to get 100%. I still haven’t gotten everything but I promise you that getting everything is worth it.

I mention this earlier but yes this game has Amiibo support. Not that it’s a bad thing since the game is compatible with all of the Amiibo line, including the special Kirby Amiibo that they released alongside the game. Using any of the four of the Kirby line will net you some nice power-ups such as the UFO Kirby, which in and of it is rare. Not only that but if you use the Smash Kirby Amiibo, you get of course Smash Kirby. Some people may not like it but Nintendo has been putting more and more into the Amiibo line but what can you do. Using any of the other Amiibo can net you a random power-up and a health up boost. It adds more to the game but it can also be useful especially at the True Arena where you really need some leverage against the tougher opposition.

Kirby: Planet Robobot follows the adage really well and it delivered on so many levels. The Robobot Armor adds something new to the game while keeping the formula familiar. You have gameplay that is just as good, the design being solid with the technology theme and music that’s divine to listen to. It’s a great game for kids and adults plus it’s pretty easy to pick up and play. This is a game that’s worth its price and the content that comes with it is proof of that. If you want a 3DS game that’s going to give you an enjoyable experience, Planet Robobot is for you!

I give Kirby: Planet Robobot a 9 out of 10. It is a MUST-BUY game and I highly recommend it.

Smash Bros. 3DS Last Hurrah Pt. 1

With the Wii U version coming on Friday, I figure why not do a sendoff before the Wii U comes. What you’re going to see is a compilation of Smash replays that will span 3 days. Today will have my friend battles against SLOPlays along with a template test that may probably be used for Smash on the Wii U. Enjoy.