Tag Archives: Mario

Mario Sports Superstars Review

Mario Sports Superstars Review – Written by jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the purposes of this review.

Mario & sports games go hand in hand ever since the days of the Nintendo 64. It’s proven fact. However with the more recent sports games such as Mario Tennis: Ultra Smash not being up to par, Nintendo along with Camelot Software needed something to hopefully get people into it. The end result is Mario Sports Superstars. Similar to Mario Sports Mix, released in 2011 for the Wii, Sports Superstars is a compilation package containing five different sports games in one cartridge. The question is… does it carry the same feel as Sports Mix or is this one set players should pass up?

Similar to Mario Sports Mix, Mario Sports Superstars contains five different sports: soccer, baseball, tennis, golf and horse racing. They aren’t mini-games per se but rather full recreations down to the core. There is no story to the game. You can just pick up and play rather easily. Each sport offers a different experience and challenge. Elements from previous Mario sports games take full effect here. Soccer is 11-vs-11 gameplay with two teams battling to score the most goals. Soccer also has access to various options and strategies to accommodate the actual sports’ rules. Baseball has two teams of 9 characters playing against each other. Sadly it’s all pretty basic like the sport itself. Golf is just like every other Mario based golf game where you tee off for 9 holes to get the lowest score. There’s also a Ring Challenge mode for players where they can send the ball through large rings dotted around the course. It’s in training mode unfortunately.

Tennis is just like in Mario Tennis with various features taken from the more recent installments. Players can take part in either singles (1-on-1) or doubles (2-on-2). Many various shots such as Chance Shots, Jump Shots and the powerful Ultra Smash make a return as well adding for fast paced action. Horse Racing is one of the games’ new modes. You take control of a Mario character as you race against several opponents on horseback while dodging obstacles and leaping over hazards. You can choose your horse, what build it can be and even customize it in a variety of ways. They can also be groomed, petted or fed to boost bonds that can help in the races. All of this happens via Stable Mode done and controlled in first person. You can do many things in the stable mode and find rare items along the way. Competing in races and winning net you reward food that you can use to boost bonds along with moods. For a compilation, this is the best out of all the modes since it offers so much to do.

Mario Sports Superstars has both single and multiplayer for all game types. Tournament is the game’s single player, a 3-tier system where you and 7 opponents battle each other to reach the top. Beating one cup unlocks the other until you reach the highest difficulty, the Champion’s Cup. Beating it unlocks the character’s star version. Star characters are improved versions of them & it has to be done for every game. It can be very tedious and repetitive. Training Mode is also available. Each of the five games have a mode where you can practice and improve. Ring Challenge is available in all games and has four difficulty settings, offering a lot of time and fun. Length for the game depends on how much they want to put into it to unlock everything. There are characters you can unlock by winning 1st in the tournament modes. Multiplayer is also available via local or online. Depending on the game mode, you can have up to 4-6 players play local or 2-6 online. It’s acceptable but I wish in regards to local multiplayer that the option to Download Play should be included for people that don’t own the game. Overall, pretty standard stuff for Mario Sports games and I’m thankful it’s included otherwise the game would just be a bore.

The presentation is rather average at best. Nintendo took elements from previous Mario sports titles and integrated them into this one. There isn’t much to say about it. Controls are good, easy to work with and simple for people that want to pick up and play. The old adage still follows here, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Music is okay at best. Some tracks are good but not as much.

There are a few issues. Most of the games aside from horse racing don’t offer anything interesting, as in no gimmicky features that the previous Mario sports games bring. The tournament can be a repetition and the harder difficulties don’t help matters especially when you wish to unlock the rest of the characters, especially the star versions. It also doesn’t help that if you want to play with other players they need their own copy of the game. Another misstep, I say.

Like every Mario game, this has Amiibo support and they come in the form of Amiibo cards. Using these unlock star versions of specified characters. They can also be used power up characters to unlock superstar versions. It’s nice for people that don’t want to grind up so much to unlock them. Tapping three Amiibo cards accesses the Road to Superstar mini game. You need to defeat the boss in order to complete the game to unlock the superstar version. Speaking of which, the game has a collection and they need to buy packs of cards with coins to complete whole set. All this does is unlock the credits and sound test.

Overall Mario Sports Superstars is a pretty decent game. It’s decent but not enough to get you hooked onto for hours at a time. The games are all right with horse racing being the best out of them and it has single and multiplayer. However the game does have its issues. With many being its repetitive grind in the tournament mode, lack of gimmicks and multiplayer woes. Does it hurt the game? A little but it shouldn’t stop you from enjoying a pretty good game. Nintendo should hopefully learn from this and maybe provide a better game, especially with the Switch now being out and all. Mario Sports Superstars is fun, just not for long sessions.

I give Mario Sports Superstars a 7 out of 10.

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Super Mario Odyssey Review

Super Mario Odyssey Review

Written by Jose Vega
Edited by Max R, aka OneOneTwo

Purchased copy for the sake of review.

Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release Date: October 27, 2017
Suggested Retail Price: $59.99
ESRB Rating: E10+

For every console Nintendo brings out, there will be a Mario game that stands as the pinnacle of each console generation. When Nintendo announced their new console the Switch last year, fans wonder if a Mario game would follow suit. At E3, a few months later, Nintendo announced Super Mario Odyssey. After a lot of waiting, the game is finally released. It would go on to sell more than 2 million copies in 3 days. Does this game deliver on the hype that Nintendo provided?

The story in Mario games tends to be simple with a few twists here and there. This game is no exception. The plot involves Mario having to stop Bowser yet again. However, there is a twist, it’s that he kidnapped Princess Peach for the sole reason of marrying her. But Mario isn’t alone. He teams up with a Bonneter named Cappy who’s along for the ride to save his little sister Tiara. Together the two of them travel all over the world to stop Bowser, save Peach and Tiara and deal with a gang of rabbit wedding planners called the Broodals.

It’s the same as with every Mario game with Mario having to save Princess Peach from Bowser. This is no exception here, but I for one like it. What’s interesting is that now there’s an actual premise with a wedding and Bowser bringing along a new set of minions to keep Mario occupied. It’s familiar but I feel it’s fresh. It’s what you are used to when playing a Mario game.

What about the meat and potatoes, the gameplay? The game feels familiar yet offers something new in the process. If you have played a previous 3D Mario platformer, then you’ll feel right at home. Mario plays exactly how he should and Nintendo has taken great care in having it feel familiar. But like every Mario game, they always offer something to make the experience rewarding. Cappy is an excellent example of this. Cappy is Odyssey’s main gimmick and he is useful in a variety of ways. For example, you can throw Cappy at anything whether it be enemy, creature or object to possess it. Cappy also provides a secondary function, serving as a platform used for extending jumps or taking down enemies from afar. This also serves to replace Power-ups for this game. It has a variety of features and they’ll be needed whether to solve puzzles, attack enemies or find Power Moons. Power Moons are like the Power Stars of Odyssey. Like in previous Mario games, collecting them is needed. This time, they serve the purpose of powering up your ship, the Odyssey so you can travel from one kingdom to the next. There are a total of 17 kingdoms to explore. Each kingdom also has special currency called Regional Coins that you have to collect in order to get clothes native to the respective place. You can also use regular coins to buy items as well such as Power Moons and increased health.

As for the controls, there are many ways on how to play the game. For the best experience, it’s recommended that you play with the Joy-Cons in each hand. The motion controls for it are precise and they provide a lot of additional features. Other options such as the Pro Controller are allowed but either way, you have many options to choose from. There’s also co-op where one player plays Mario and the other Cappy and you can team up to play through the game. Odyssey is one of these games that will have you spend a long time finding everything. It’s a collect-a-thon yes but a very good one. Length-wise, the game will take you 15-20 hours to complete but if you plan on trying to 100% the game, it’s much longer around 40-60 hours. The replay value for it is very high and even after beating the game, there is a lot to do. There are plenty of boss fights with each area offering a challenge. It’s not too hard or too easy, it’s the right amount of challenge. Sometimes you even have to rely on the environment around you to win.

Mario Odyssey is home to many kingdoms for Mario and Cappy to explore. From a presentation standpoint, the game is amazing. Each kingdom offers something different and how they look is marvelous. Whether it is the desert locale of Sand Kingdom or the big city of Metro Kingdom, Odyssey never disappoints. The main characters like Mario, Cappy, Bowser and Peach are very expressive. Many of the world’s inhabitants also look well and depending on where you go, it offers something new. The music is amazing, with each world having several tracks that represent the many areas. Jump Up, Super Star, the theme of Mario Odyssey is catchy and addicting. Pauline’s voice actor, Kate Higgins nailed it and it shows.

Honestly, I couldn’t find anything wrong with a game like Super Mario Odyssey. It felt as if everything from previous Mario games has been put into a blender delivering something that is fantastic. To be fair, one nitpick that I have with this game is that they removed lives, which has been a staple in every main Mario game. It’s the first and only game I know where it’s impossible to get a game over. When Mario dies, he loses 10 coins and since as you play, you’ll get tons of coins making it pretty much an afterthought. I feel that this streamlines the game to make it more accessible and I feel it was the right choice. Like every Nintendo game, there is Amiibo support and using any of the Mario line of Amiibos unlocks new costumes for Mario to wear. Mario Odyssey also has its own special line of Amiibo in the form of wedding variants of Mario, Bowser and Peach. Using any of them unlocks some wedding costumes for Mario to wear. Seeing Mario dressed in a bridal gown is a bit funny but kind of weird. Note that Amiibo are not required and one can still 100% the game without them, albeit it is a little trickier to do so.

Super Mario Odyssey is everything that you would love about 3D Mario games, taking everything that made the previous games great and perfecting it in every way. You have incredible gameplay, a presentation that’s second to none, responsive controls, high replay value, great music and tons to do. It’s insane how Nintendo is able to pull something like this off and they did. They did the impossible and I can honestly say that Super Mario Odyssey is the best Mario game ever made. If you’re looking forward to owning a Nintendo Switch and you can’t decide what game you want first, get this one. You will not regret it. This is one journey you don’t want to ever miss out on.

A tough decision, I know. I give Super Mario Odyssey a flawless 10 out of 10. It’s a must-buy for anyone that either owns a Nintendo Switch or plans on getting one.

Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions Review

Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for this review.

14 years ago, Nintendo and Alphadream released Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga for the Game Boy Advance. It focuses on the Mario Bros. as they journey to rescue Princess Peach’s voice from an evil sorceress. It launched a franchise with each sequel stepping up to deliver a satisfying experience, mostly. During E3 2017, Nintendo announced that the game that started it all would be getting a remake, with a twist. It came to be known as Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions, with the addition focusing on Bowser’s entourage of mooks seeking their master. On a handheld like the 3DS, does this remake stand tall alongside the original GBA classic?

The story centers on Mario & Luigi on yet another adventure. What starts as a goodwill meeting goes south when an evil sorceress named Cackletta and her assistant Fawful steal Princess Peach’s voice and replacing it with an explosive vocabulary. But they aren’t alone. They get help from Bowser who also wants in. Together the three head for the Beanbean Kingdom to recover Peach’s voice and deal with Cackletta and her cohort.

It’s the same as the original and I have no complaints with it. The story is just as enjoyable and in some cases, hilarious.

The game plays exactly like the original in both field and battle phases. On the field, Mario & Luigi play the same way with the D-Pad (or analog stick) moving them and both A & B buttons have the two do various actions such as jumping, using hammers or various other abilities. It’s needed to solve the many puzzles you’ll encounter in the game. In battle, it’s the same way. You use Mario & Luigi respectively in turn-based battles against enemies. As you progress and get stronger, you’ll have access to a slew of different abilities that can be used in both field and battle. They can also be upgraded to Super (Advanced) versions that are stronger, giving players a variety of ways to take down foes. With the 3DS hardware, the game offers a lot more features. The touchscreen, for example, provides a map of the areas you visit as well as shortcuts for the commands they can use on the field. In battle, the bottom screen details your characters’ stats and when you do moves, they provide instructions on how to use them. It’s great for beginners but an afterthought for those who have already experienced the game. The game also includes an Easy Mode for those who feel the main game is hard and it can be turned on and off at any time. It’s good for new players but for those who already played it, it’s an unnecessary addition.

In addition to the main game, you also have Minion Quest, a side-story that tells the story from the perspective of Bowser’s minions as they journey to seek their fallen master. It’s a mix between RTS and RPG as you lead a squad of minions to battle against enemies. You take control of a Goomba who becomes Captain and the objective in each fight is to take out the other captain before he takes the Goomba out. After completing each stage, you get experience used to level up your units. You can have up to 8 units in your group and hold up to a total of 40 units. It also follows a rock-paper-scissors mechanic in terms of advantages. You have three types of units: Melee, Ranged, and Flight. Melee beats Range, Range beat Flight and Flight beats Melee. Limiting your army to 8 units requires players to plan well for each encounter and if things go bad, you can retreat and try again. It’s a nice and enjoyable side game that adds to the story of the overall game. Plus you can go back to previous levels to strengthen your units.

Length-wise, the remake of Superstar Saga will keep you busy for some time. The main game will take around 15-18 hours to complete while Minion Quest is a 6-hour romp. You’ll have a lot to do in this game. Presentation-wise, the game is a step up compared to the original. The many areas of Beanbean Kingdom are amazing to look at. In addition, the same can be said for the characters and enemies. They look good and faithful just like the GBA version. Battles are especially funny when it comes to the characters and when Bros. Attacks fail, they lead to some hilarious stuff. There is some voice acting but most of it is simply gibberish. It makes sense since it’s a Mario & Luigi game and it does fit well. Music is just as good as the original. Being that it’s on a 3DS, it’s a step up from the original giving us familiar yet good tunes. The game also has Amiibo support, using figures from the Super Mario line. They can be used to get stamps that can be exchanged for prizes. Pretty nifty.

From my experience, I couldn’t find anything that is deemed negative about the game. There are times where the game throws a curveball and make it hard but honestly, it’s a game that can be challenging if you allow it to be. Items are plentiful and by the time you reach the end, you’ll be more than prepared. Also, the game plays in 2D by default and it’s a good thing since it’ll be easier on the eyes. Fitting since the GBA game is the same way.

For a 3DS remake, Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions is a very good remake. The game feels and plays familiar. Minion Quest offers a nice side game. What else is there to say? Nintendo and Alphadream brought the GBA classic to the 3DS and they did it well. If you were unable to play the original GBA version, this is your best choice. It’s a good starting point for people to get into the series and for those that want to relive it. Nintendo didn’t disappoint. This game is a certified winner.

I give Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions a solid 9 out of 10. It’s worth your money, I mean it.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Review

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe Review – Written by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

Three years ago, Mario Kart 8 was released on the Wii U and though it was a great game, it was on a console that not many people bought. When Nintendo announced their new console back in 2016, it was hinted that there would be a possible Mario Kart. Those hints prove to be true when it was announced that a port of the game would be coming to the new console. But it isn’t just any port. This is Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, taking the original Wii U game and adding a whole bunch of new features. Is this game worth getting on the Nintendo Switch? The answer is yes. Absolutely.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is filled to the brim with content that is fun with friends or solo. You can take part in the Grand Prix, consisting of 12 cups spanning 48 courses. Many are new, some are revised classics from previous games and the rest are of the DLC cups that were in the last game. As you play through each track in the cups, you can collect coins that can be used to unlock new stuff. In Mario Kart 8 you would unlock new characters and parts. Deluxe makes this less of a grind by having all the characters unlocked from the get-go. For one thing, it’s awesome that you have everyone unlocked including the DLC characters.

What makes it better is that MK8 Deluxe introduces some new ones: Bowser Jr., Dry Bones, King Boo and the Inklings from Splatoon. It raises the character count to 43, which makes this the biggest cast for a racing game. You also have access to difficulty modes from 50 to 200cc, unlocked from the start, including mirror mode. There’s also Time Trials for those that want to test their skills and Versus where up to 4 players can race each other. Also in races, you can now hold up to 2 items, similar to Double Dash. It adds another level of strategy but at the same time it leads to some crazy shenanigans especially in multiplayer.

One of the biggest negatives Mario Kart 8 had was its battle mode being lackluster. Nintendo seem to get the message and decided to do a complete revamp. Battle Mode in this game has been redone, implementing a scoring system and providing players with 8 battle courses, 5 new, three retro. In addition there are 5 mode types: Balloon Battle, Renegade Roundup, Bob-omb Blast, Coin Runners and Shine Thief. Renegade Roundup is like “cops and robbers” where players are split into two teams. One are the cops, the other are the robbers. All of this now adds more to a game that truthfully feels like a complete package.

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe also has Online Racing where up to 2 players can race together against players from all over the world. You can compete either in Worldwide or Regional in both Racing and Battling. As far as stability goes, it’s good. There are times where connection errors happen but overall it’s a pleasant experience. Players can set up online tournaments easy and up to 12 players can take part in races or battles. A lot to take in and the replay value for the game is at an all time high. No joke. Also you have access to three different control schemes: Switch Pro Controller, Joycon Grip or individual Joycon. With two Joycon controllers, they count as having two players. That’s incredible but a little tough to adjust for some people.

Compared to the Wii U version, this port of Mario Kart 8 delivers an improved presentation. It looks a lot better with the game now running at 1080p at 60 fps. A big improvement compared to the original running at 720p. With the improved 1080p, the visuals get an upgrade where even the small details can be seen. Loading times are reduced from 22 to 9 seconds. Better if you just want to race and have fun. The music is still a delight to listen to with many tracks having very good tunes. The controls are refined and spot on. Fun to use whether using a Joycon or a Switch Pro Controller. There’s also wireless play where with 2 Switch consoles, you can have up to 8 players playing it. Though it isn’t easy to do, having a lot of people together for a game makes it truly a delight. Like the previous game, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe has Amiibo support where you can scan them to get costumes for your Mii. This time around, they now expand beyond Mario & Smash characters and into stuff like Splatoon. It’s simply cosmetic but nice to see.

In conclusion, Mario Kart 8 Deluxe takes everything that makes Mario Kart 8 great and turn it into something better. Containing all the DLC, an improved battle mode, good online, tight controls, great music, amazing presentation, what else is there to like? Everything. If you haven’t gotten a chance to play it on the Wii U and you have a Switch, this is a must-buy game. Since it is now the fastest selling Switch title, you can’t deny that it’s good. In fact, it’s excellent. Get some friends, buy this game and you’ll see just how amazing Mario Kart can be. You won’t regret it.

I give Mario Kart 8 Deluxe a perfect 10 out of 10. It is worth the full purchase price.

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS Review

Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS – A Review by Jose Vega

Product provided by Nintendo for the sake of this review.

In 2015, Super Mario Maker was released for the Nintendo Wii U. For the first time ever, players were given the opportunity to create their own Mario levels and share them with players online all over the world. The game was a huge hit and creators went wild, coming up with levels that amaze while pushing players to their limits. A year later, Nintendo announced that Super Mario Maker will be coming to the Nintendo 3DS. Now that it has been released, does this game hold well to its Wii U counterpart?

If you played Super Mario Maker on the Wii U, you’ll feel real familiar with this game on the 3DS. Creating levels are easy to do with the bottom screen while the top serves as your platform. Pretty nifty. However like the Wii U version, you won’t have everything unlocked from the get-go. One difference this version has over the other is the Super Mario Challenge. It’s a mode exclusive for the Nintendo 3DS version and you tackle 18 worlds containing more than 100 courses. All the courses carry objectives and they can range from like collecting all 100 coins to gaining a set number of 1-Ups. This adds a bit of variety and challenge while teaching players how to use specific items to complete courses. The Super Mario Challenge can take players around 8-10 hours if they want to obtain 100% completion. The 100-Mario Challenge is also in this game and like the Wii U version they come in multiple difficulties, adding more hours of game time.

For a 3DS game, they nailed this port well. Very well I might add. Design-wise, the game is like the Wii U version and I will admit, seeing the old school Mario Bros. style in a handheld is real cool along with the others. However when it comes to the New Super Mario Bros. U style, it feels a bit blocky. Not that it’s a bad thing but since you’re playing a handheld port of a Wii U game it’s to be expected. But it’s pretty solid and I commend Nintendo for pulling it off. I only wish they could fix it so it can work but hey, what can you do?

Though this game is similar to the Wii U version, there are some things that differentiate it. First, there’s no Amiibo compatibility with the game. My guess it was due to game limitations but it’s pretty minor. Second is that you can’t share your courses online. The 3DS version gives you the option to share your courses but only through Local Play. In addition you can have other players edit your shared courses. If you have friends then this is a good thing but honestly, having that instead of sharing online hurts the game in the long run. It hurts because without the option to share online, it sort of reduces the value this game has over the Wii U version. I feel it’s a missed opportunity for Nintendo to make this game be just as awesome as the Wii U version. Sadly they didn’t and it hurts. That’s not to say the game is bad though. Also it’s recommended that the game is played on the New Nintendo 3DS handhelds. Original 3DS handhelds can handle the game but more likely than not, the game can crash. A minor issue at best.

Super Mario Maker for the Nintendo 3DS could have given Nintendo an opportunity to bring their most successful game onto the handheld. Despite the game playing just as good as the Wii U counterpart, it lacked a few things that differentiate it. But regardless Super Mario Maker for the 3DS is an enjoyable game that offers a lot for $40. I enjoyed this game, despite the drawbacks. But if you want the full experience, the Wii U version is your best bet but the 3DS does stand out on its own as a good game.

I give Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS a 7 out of 10.

Mario Party Star Rush Review

Product provided by Nintendo. Special thanks to Nintendo for giving me this opportunity to cover this game.

Mario Party has always been known to be a game where you and a few friends can sit back, have fun and see how much hilarity can ensue amongst each other. The franchise hasn’t had much success in recent years. It started being a turn based game and has stuck from the first game all the way to Mario Party 8. However the game went in a different direction with the use of vehicle based movement in Mario Party 9 and the overreliance of Amiibo functionality in Mario Party 10. The franchise wasn’t limited to consoles. They tried their luck with handhelds. After the mixed reception of Mario Party Island Tour, Nintendo and Nd Cube try their luck with Mario Party Star Rush. Will it suffer the same fate as its previous entry or have they got something up their sleeve that’ll make it a well-needed hit?

Mario Party always had a formula that worked while adding little things to improve the game experience. In the case of Star Rush, the turn-based gameplay that has been a staple since the beginning has been removed completely. Instead once everyone roll the dice, they all move at the same time. You can also determine where you go before you move. This adds a layer of strategy but at the same time you need to be aware of what your opponents will do. It’s a matter of predicting the best course of action on the playing boards. If you want to make sure to have an advantage, careful planning is key. At first I didn’t like that they removed the turn-based gameplay but it grew on me over time. I like it. It saves me a lot of time while providing something fresh, new and fast paced. Future Mario Party games should implement this style. Imagine the craziness that can ensue with everyone moving at the same time, trying to reach where they need to be.

Star Rush has multiple modes for you to tackle with Toad Scramble as the main mode. Up to 4 players can play as a Toad and trek through various boards, gathering Mario characters as allies and taking on bosses in mini games to recover Power Stars. Each character has their own unique ability and dice and it can help turn the tide. You can have up to 4 ally characters in one time and having more allies mean more of an advantage. Bear in mind that it can be a disadvantage if your opponent has more allies than you so be careful.

Items are aplenty in this game though not as big as in the previous games but they do add something to the game that can be good or bad. It’s random and it’s what Mario Party boils down to in a nutshell. Mini games are also the name of the game in Mario Party and there are many. They depend on the control scheme. Some are simple using buttons and an analog stick (or d-pad) while others take advantage of the touch screen. It works, giving it variety. However some mini games can be a bit of a pain to do than others and depending if you either have a regular 3DS or a New 3DS XL then some can be without a doubt annoying due to the microphone.

In addition to Toad Scramble, there are other game modes. Coinathlon is a race where up to four players collect as many coins as they can in minute long designated coin mini games to progress through three laps. They get hectic and it comes in two modes: Free Play and Rival Race. Mario Shuffle is a two-player game that uses Amiibo functionality. Using Amiibo figures, players race across a one-way board to the goal with one going right, the other left. If you don’t have Amiibo, cardboard cutouts are used. Balloon Bash is like Toad Scramble but you collect coins and stars in a mini board with a turn limit and mini games. You can also play as any Mario character so that’s a plus. Rhythm Recital is where up to four players work together and play classic Mario tunes using the Touch Screen. Challenge Tower is a single player game where you have to climb a tower with LED Spaces on it. There are varying difficulties with some being harder than others. Last but not least is Boo’s Block Party, a puzzle game where you spin sides of a number block to earn points. If you move enough of the same block, they get sent to the other player. It’s addicting and challenging if you want to get the high score.

There’s a lot to do in the game and let’s face it. Half of the time you’re going to be spending it trying to complete the modes to level up. Star Rush has a leveling system where as you play, you earn points. Once you gain enough, you level up and unlock either a new mode or a new character. It’ll take hours trying to unlock everything and it can be quite a challenge. It can get a bit repetitive too having to do it over and over just to unlock everything. The game offers a lot but I wish there’d be something to alleviate things. But if I had any issues with it, it’s that most of the time you’ll be playing it in single player. If you want to play multiplayer, each of you must have your own 3DS and a copy of the game or the free Download Play that you can get on the eShop. It’s like Smash Bros. for 3DS.

Overall, I can say that Mario Party Star Rush improves the formula in some ways. Having a fast paced style where everyone plans their moves adds layers of strategy. Various modes add replayability plus with 4-player co-op equaling insanity. What else can I say? I know games should try to implement new things but this is a step in the right direction. If you have friends and a few 3DS handhelds, then you will have a fun time.

I give Mario Party Star Rush an 8 out of 10. It earns my personal SEAL OF APPROVAL.